PRINCESS DIANA’S KLONDIKE DRESS

NOW ON DISPLAY AT THE QUEEN MARY IN LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA
www.queenmary.com

By
 
                                Michael H. Smith, PhD
         
                         © Michael H. Smith, 2002, 2009, 2012
                               (last updated 7/03/12)

Summary and description of Princess Diana’s Klondike Ensemble

Picture of Prince Charles and Princess Diana Wearing Klondike Attire in Canada 

Princess Diana’s Klondike Ensemble is a Pink/Peach Silk Period Dress and Hat in the style of 1880 worn by her during a Royal Tour to Canada in 1983. The dress is a form-fitting princess line gown of wild silk, with swagged overskirt ruched at sides and back to reveal a silk lace flounced underskirt and back train; the lace is repeated at the collar, bodice jabot and cuffs. The dress also contains interior bodice boning. The hat consists of cream petal straw trimmed with period velours au sabre silk ribbon, silk flowers and pearl sprigs. Both the dress and hat are currently in excellent condition. Princess Diana wore the dress and hat June 1983, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, at a Klondike period gala event. The event was part of the Prince and Princess's Canadian Royal Tour of that year. In need of an appropriate gown for the occasion, she chose this one from a selection of period pieces brought to her at Kensington Palace by Oscar-winning costume designer John Bright, at whose studio, Cosprop, the dress was made. This dress, which Diana mischievously chose, was first worn by Francesca Annis in the 1978 mini-series “Lillie” (Lillie Langtry (“Lillie”), along with Prince Charles’s mistress Camilla Parker Bowles’s great-grandmother, Alice Keppel, had both been mistresses of Charles’s great-great grandfather Edward VII when he was Prince of Wales in the late 1800’s [98]). Linda Mattock [77] had designed this dress as a “Langtry” dress, exemplifying the essence of Lillie’s style. Diana then had the Klondike dress personally fitted on her by Mr. Bright and he altered it to her measurements. Mr. Bright also designed and made the hat specifically for Diana to wear with the dress. After Princess Diana wore the dress and hat, John Bright stored them until they were sold in association with Bonham's of London to Dr. Michael H. Smith for the benefit of MediCinema (a charitable organization that enhances the care of hospital patients by providing free film screenings to them and their families) [66]. The dress is currently on loan to Kensington Palace. The fairy-tale princess-like Klondike dress and hat is one of Diana’s most published ensembles, with pictures or articles of her wearing it appearing in over 100 publications, including books, newspapers, magazines, CD ROMs, web pages, postcards, videos, etc. Even dolls have been made of her wearing this dress and hat.

History, Documentation and Published Photographs of DIANA’S KLONDIKE Ensemble

During the official Canadian Royal tour in June and July 1983, the Prince and Princess of Wales visited Edmonton, Alberta. On Wednesday, June 29th, two days before Diana’s 22nd birthday, Charles and Diana were guests of honor at an evening barbecue at the historic recreation of Fort Edmonton.  The invitation requested “Dress semi-formal, Klondike Era”, reflecting the annual celebration in Edmonton of the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush. Both royals wore period ensembles for this event. Charles wore late 19th century formal wear (similar to what his Great Great Grandfather Edward VII might have worn) and Diana wore this beautiful pink/peach silk 1880’s period day dress and hat. As noted in [39], this was “undoubtedly the highlight of their 18-day tour”.

 

Diana’s Klondike dress, designed by Linda Mattock for “Lillie” (Linda was nominated for a BAFTA award for her costume designs for “Lillie” and later won the BAFTA award for her costume designs for “Poirot”) and created by John Bright (who won the Academy Award for his costume designs for “Room With A View”), is a form-fitting princess line gown of pink/peach wild silk with a swagged overskirt ruched at sides and back to reveal a silk lace flounced underskirt and a short train. The lace is repeated at the collar, jabot and cuffs. The coordinating hat, which Bright designed specifically for Diana, is cream petal straw trimmed with period velours au sabre silk ribbon, silk flowers and pearl sprigs [66].

 Picture of Princess Diana wearing Klondike Hat Designed by John Bright

What is fascinating about this dress is that it is perhaps the only dress Diana ever wore that had any history behind it. Several years before, the dress was first worn by Francesca Annis in “Lillie Langtry”, a thirteen-part BBC mini-series in 1978. The story of Lillie Langtry, an accomplished woman whose status of a mere beauty took her not only to the theater’s stage, but to the bed of the Prince of Wales (Edward VII), to other affairs, and into the scandalous spotlight of Edwardian society (along with its own “paparazzi”) [79], [99], [103], [104], [107], [108], is perhaps strangely prophetic of Diana’s life. Furthermore, both women were the fashion icons of their eras [110], [99]. In fact, Diana knew the story of Lillie Langtry, had seen “Lillie” and the dress in it, and had mischievously chosen this dress when shown it while looking at a selection of gowns created by John Bright. Impishly, she told Mr. Bright that “she wouldn’t mention it around the palace” about the history of the dress [80] (Interestingly, in “Lillie”, Francesca Annis wears the dress in a scene where Prince Louis, Prince Charles great-great grandfather, first confesses his love for Lillie and Lillie later confides her desire to have an affair with him). As noted in [94], Diana knew at this time about Camilla Parker-Bowles, Prince Charles’s long-time mistress [95], [96], [97], (e.g., see interesting pictures of Charles, Diana and Camilla together in [95], [96]) and she also knew that Camilla’s great-grandmother, Alice Keppel, along with Lillie Langtry, had both been mistresses of Charles’s great-great grandfather Edward VII [109], [110], [113]. In fact, the story of Camilla’s first meeting with the Prince of Wales in 1972 is well known. Camilla introduced herself to Prince Charles by telling him that her great-grandmother, Alice Keppel, had been the mistress of his great-great grandfather Edward VII, and ended with the comment “…so how about it, Sir?”” [94]. In fact, Edward VII was attracted in part to both Lillie Langtry and Alice Keppel because both were highly intelligent and mentally interesting. Alice Keppel [112], whom unlike Lillie Langtry was not known as a great beauty (“Her charm was not in her looks” [111]), had her relationship with Edward VII described as “…the king had found not only a woman who, in the evening of his life, would excite him physically as well as relaxing him mentally (a rare combination in itself)” [111].

 

As noted by the author of one book [32] discussing Diana wearing this dress in Edmonton at the Klondike barbeque: “Guests with a taste for history enjoyed the joke – Lillie Langtry had been well known as the mistress of Edward VII, Prince Charles’ great-great-grandfather, when he was still Prince of Wales and cutting a notorious swathe through the high society of the European capitals.” Edward VII had a reputation as “a connoisseur of wine, haute cuisine, fast horses, and beautiful woman” [108].

 The Klondike Dress and Hat Today

In fact, there are also other connections between Princess Diana, Prince Charles, Camilla Parker Bowles, Lillie Langtry, Alice Keppel, Edward VII, and his wife Queen Alexandra. For example, Queen Alexandra was the first “Queen of Hearts” [110]; Diana was another [129], [147]. Prince Charles’s great grandfather (Prince Louis of Battenberg) was the father of Lillie Langtry’s daughter [110], [99]. Both Prince Charles and Prince Edward had affairs soon after they were married to the Princess of Wales (Alexandra and Diana) [94], [110]. Princess Alexandra liked Lillie Langtry but disliked Alice Keppel [110], [99]. Prince Charles, Princess Diana, Edward VII and Lillie Langtry all visited Canada [1], [99], (in fact, Lillie Langtry also visited Edmonton and Calgary - “She made Canada, between Halifax and Edmonton, at least an incidental part of all her tours except that of 1886-87…” [100], [101]).

 

Thus, because of the uniqueness of Diana’s Klondike ensemble, the fact it was designed by two award winning designers, the story behind it, the historical importance of the royal visit (and Langtry’s visits to Edmonton as well), and the love affair that developed between Diana and the Canadian people, Diana’s ensemble has become a famous International and Canadian cultural icon. As Anne Lambert, professor and curator at the University of Alberta’s Clothing and Textiles Collection, has stated: “...the image moves people because it depicts Charles and Diana at a very happy period of their marriage when they were the fairytale couple.” [89]. Furthermore, because the Klondike dress and hat is in the style of the late 1800’s when royalty was in its vogue, for many people the image of Diana wearing it is that of a fairy-tale princess. Also, as time passes by, many of Diana’s contemporary outfits are starting to look dated, whereas the Klondike outfit is timeless. For these reasons, not only have dolls been made of Princess Diana wearing the Klondike dress and hat, but over 200 photographs of Diana wearing her Klondike ensemble have appeared in numerous books, newspapers, magazines, video tapes, newspapers, postcards, CD ROMs, DVDs, on at least one plate, an auction catalog, and other items, making it one of the most published and famous dresses that Diana wore. As a Harvard Professor once stated: “The context of any artifact, that’s its value.”

This web site alone gets about 600,000 to 1 million hits per year. (In fact, as of December 21, 2008, when one types in “Princess Diana Dress” on Google, this web site was listed number 11 out of 527,000 results [148].) In addition, numerous other internet web sites also have information and pictures about this dress and hat.

Of the published print pictures, the author has in his collection 36 of the more popular books that contain pictures of Diana wearing the Klondike ensemble (found during a brief and partial survey of books published on Princess Diana – there are likely to be many more):

 

Charles and Diana Visit Canada [1]

Diana, Princess of Wales: A Tribute [2]

Diana, Princess of Fashion [3]

Diana, Her Life & Her Legacy [4]

The Canadian Royal Tour [5]

Princess Diana [6]

The Story of the Royal Family [7]

A Princely Marriage [8]

Royal Canada [9]

Royalty in Vogue [10]

In Person the Prince and Princess of Wales [11]

On the Royal Road, a Decade of Photographing The Royal Family [12]

The Story of the Royal Family in Celebration of the Queen’s 60th Birthday and the Royal Wedding [13]

Diana the Radiant Princess [14]Picture of Diana in Full Klondike Attire.

Diana The Fashion Princess [15]

The Story of Prince Charles [16]

The Royal Year [17]

Princess Diana Pop-Up Book [18]

The Royal Family Today [19]

Diana Princess of Wales, the Book of Fashion [20]

Diana, A Tribute [21]

Charles & Diana, A 10th Anniversary Celebration [22]

Princess Lady of Fashion [23]

Diana the Story So Far [24]

Diana, A Life and A Legacy [25]

Queen Elizabeth & Diana Princess of Wales [26]

Charles & Diana: A Family Album [27]

The 10th Anniversary Commemorative Edition Charles & Diana A Portrait of a Marriage [28]

The Story of Diana [29]

Charles & Diana – The First Five Years [30]

Charles and Diana's Tour of North America [31]

Princess Diana, A Year of Triumph [32]

The Radiant Princess [33]

Diana Unseen Archives [34]

Debrett’s Illustrated Fashion Guide, The Princess of Wales  [35]

Royal Family Yearbook [36]

 

Also, there are a number of magazine commemorative, collector editions, and regular issues showing Diana wearing this ensemble, including:

 

Macleans: Diana, Her Life and Legacy [37]

Royalty: The First Ten Years Charles and Diana, Royalty Collectors Edition 4 [38]

Royalty: Volume 3, Number 2. [39]

Majesty: Volume 4, Number 5 [40]

Hello!: Number 46 [41]

TV Guide: Diana, A tribute to her life and legacy [42]

 

Furthermore, there is video footage of her wearing this ensemble in:

 

The Princess and The People [43]

Charles and Diana: For Better or Worse [44]

Diana, The Beautiful Princess [45]

The Maple and the Crown – The Royal Family in Canada [46]

An unknown TV broadcast [47]

 

Also showing Diana’s Klondike ensemble are:

 

A number of postcards [48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55] and pictures [56,57] (some taken by the mayor of Edmonton)

Numerous newspapers [58]

At least one plate [59]

At least one calendar [60]

Various miscellaneous 8 x 10 photos [61]

 

Furthermore, several CD-ROMs contain pictures:

 

The People’s Princess [62]

Princess Diana & The Royal Family [63]

Princess Diana Photo Gallery [64]

Princess Diana 1983 Photos [65]

 

Finally, there are two auction catalogs that have pictures:

 

A William Doyle Galleries auction catalog (with a picture of the full ensemble taken in 1999) [66]

A Bud Haynes & Co. auction catalog (with two pictures of the full ensemble) [67]

 

The above references are just some of the items showing pictures of Diana’s Klondike ensemble.  There are others, but the author has verified only these.  Furthermore, there are other books, magazines, and newsletters that do not contain pictures of the Klondike ensemble but do refer to it, such as:

 

Diana, Her Latest Fashions [68]

Majesty: Volume 4, Number 4 [69]

Newsletter of the Centerville Historical Museum [70]

 

 The Princess Diana Doll in Full Klondike Attire Designed by Claymates

Finally, as an additional measure of significance of the importance and recognition of this ensemble, pictures of Diana wearing it have appeared on the cover of two books, Charles and Diana Visit Canada [1] and Charles and Diana's Tour of North America [31], the back cover of another book, Charles & Diana – The First Five Years [30], the cover of Royalty magazine, Volume 3, Number 26 [38], the cover of Majesty magazine, Volume 4, Number 4 [39], the cover of two CDs: Princess Diana & The Royal Family [63] and Princess Diana Photo Gallery [64], the front of a plate [59], and the front page of the Edmonton Sun [58] and other newspapers. Also, in Diana Princess of Wales, the Book of Fashion [20], the first picture in the book is a full-page picture showing Diana wearing this ensemble. Furthermore, in the Princess Diana Pop-Up Book [18], 6 of the most recognized images of Diana were chosen to be illustrated as ‘pop-ups’: (1) Barbecue at Balmoral, (2) The Balcony at Buckingham Palace (Charles & Diana’s Royal Kiss), (3) Ayers Rock (Charles & Diana on Safari in Australia), (4) The Royal Crawlabout (first photos of Prince William with Charles & Diana), (5) The Fort Edmonton Barbecue (Charles & Diana visit Canada where Diana is wearing the Klondike dress and hat), and (6) The State Opening of Parliament. Also, in April, 2000, when the Klondike dress and hat made their first re-appearance in Canada since Diana’s visit in 1983, a 14kt gold pendant was created in Red Deer, Alberta, to commemorate their return to Canada [71].

 

Additionally, at least 4 dolls have been made of Princess Diana wearing the Klondike dress and hat. One, complete with purse, gloves and boots, was made by Claymates [72]. This doll is 32" tall, has pose able arms, and features molded high heel boots (just like the ones Diana wore with the dress). The dress is a very soft peach, with white lace trimmings, matching handbag and gloves. The hat is adorned with tiny peach and white flowers and ribbon. A tiny version of Diana's blue sapphire ring can be seen on her left hand. The doll itself is from an original sculpture by Donna RuBert.

 

Another two dolls were made by Nesbet [73]. The first one was the 1985 Nesbit HRH Princess Diana (Klondike) 8” doll. The second one was a Nesbet My Princess Doll.

 

A fourth doll was made by Alma [74].

 

There is even a spoof about the dress by an anti-monarchy group [75].

 

Lillie Langtry (1853-1929), a socially ambitious vicar’s daughter, was a professional beauty who became a world-famous actress. However, she was not known for her skill as an actress – one review said of her “she does not act, she is” [100]; rather she was famous for her notorious affairs and great beauty. Daisy, Countess of Warwick, another of Edward VII’s mistresses, said of Lillie “She had dewy violet eyes, a complexion like a peach. How can words convey the vitality, the glow, the amazing charm that made this fascinating woman the center of any group she entered.” Another said of her “A creator and settor of fashions, in her attitudes to social conventions, clothes, sex, the paraphernalia of living, she was at least fifty years ahead of her times”[76].

 

Lillie’s fame (she was known as the “Jersey Lily) begun in the 1870’s when she became the rage of London society. Her dozens of aristocratic admirers included the Prince of Wales (Edward VII), and later Prince Louis of Battenberg, who fathered her only child (Both men are great-great grandfathers of Prince Charles). Her friendships and romances with the Prince of Wales and others was the talk of high society, the press and the public all over the world, especially in England, Canada and America. Besides the Prince of Wales and Louis of Battenberg, one lover gave her a lavish yacht; another gave her a luxurious private railroad car called “The Lalee” and a mansion in New York. Lillie herself also owed a magnificent racing stable and won huge amounts of money betting on her own horses. She had a town in Texas named after her. She served as her own producer, agent, and theatre owner. She had famous writers and painters, e.g., Oscar Wilde and John Millais, paint and write poems about her (Oscar Wilde called her “the new Helen”). Because of all this, because of the public’s insatiable appetite for stories and gossip about her, and as the most glamorous actress of her time, Lillie played to packed house and made a fortune (visiting Edmonton, Alberta several times).

 

In 1978, it was decided to make a thirteen-part mini-series, “Lillie”, about the life and times of Lillie Langtry. The Klondike dress was originally designed by Linda Mattock [77], [78] for Francesca Annis, who played Lillie, to wear in this production [79]. In 1983, Diana, who knew the story of Lillie and who had seen the mini-series, mischievously chose this dress from a selection of gowns created by John Bright and his costume house, COSPROP [80]. John Bright then made extensive alterations to this dress and personally fitted the dress to Diana at Kensington Palace. He also, at that time, designed and created a period-inspired hat to complete the ensemble. After the royal visit, Princess Diana returned the dress to John Bright who donated it to a charity, MediCinema. MediCinema later sold the dress to Dr. Michael Smith of Calgary in Canada through the aid of the auction house William Doyle Galleries in New York, which was in association with Bonham's of London. The dress is currently in excellent condition with some minor soiling and minor stains [81], [82]. Conservation work was done in 2000 at the University of Alberta’s Clothing and Textiles Collection with some minor stains removed and repairs made [81]. A special ethafoam body mount was made to fit the dress [83]. Finally, both John Bright and Doyle have certified that both the dress and hat worn by Princess Diana for her visit are unique and that no other copies were made [84], [85]. Also, it should be noted that by the time the Christie’s auction took place in 1997 [115], [116], [117], Diana had already returned this ensemble to John Bright, thus making it unavailable for purchase until he donated it to MediCinema. As previously mentioned, the dress and hat are currently on loan to Kensington Palace.

             

Diana’s Klondike ensemble is probably one of John Bright’s most famous and photographed creations. He first trained as a fashion designer before undertaking a two-year course at the E15 Acting School. He then designed and acted in repertory theatres and in 1965 founded COSPROP, the theatre, film and television costumes. In the early years, his individual designing was put aside while he built up his business, working on, among others, ‘The Forsyte Saga,’ “The Charge of the Light Brigade” and “Evita”. With Jenny Beavan, he designed the costumes for the Merchant-Ivory film “The Bostonians”, “White Fang”, “Mountains of the Moon”, “and “Sense and Sensibility”. He went on to design for “A Room With a View” (which won him a Best Costume Oscar), “Maurice”, “Howards End”, and “The Remains of the Day” (all of which were nominated for Oscars). He also designed the costumes for the West End production of “The Woman” and for “Eugene Onegin” at Venice’s La Fenice Opera House. Bright’s credits also include the Centenary Production of “La Boheme” at the Royal Albert Hall in London.

 Original Design of Klondike Dress by Linda Mattock

Diana’s Klondike ensemble is probably also one of Linda Mattock’s most famous and photographed designs [77], [78], [86]. She was the original designer of the dress and she designed it to capture and exemplify the essence of Lillie Langtry’s style (after research involving thousands of documents and photos). In fact, Linda was nominated for a BAFTA award for Best Costume Design for “Lillie” for this dress and others she had designed [87] for this production.

 

Linda Mattock studied fine art textiles at Manchester Art College and did her Postgraduate in Theatre Studies at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. She started her career in theatre costume and joined the BBC costume design department in 1973, later moving to LWT in 1976. Over the next 13 years she designed many productions before leaving LWT to undertake freelance work. Recent she rejoined the BBC to head a project to encourage and develop new young designers entering the broadcast and film industry. Linda received a BAFTA nomination for Lillie and was later nominated for two other productions, winning a BAFTA for “Best Costume Design 1989 for a Television Series of Agatha Christie's 'POIROT”.

 

Before designing the Klondike dress, Linda undertook extensive research into the life, image and personality of Lillie Langtry. Her design of the dress was made to reflect and help develop the characterization of Lillie while being accurate to the period. She also took into account the script requirements and action, the season, date, exact time of day, purpose, and situation that the dress would appear in. The 'shape' or silhouette was designed to enhance the actress, Francesca Annis, and her interpretation of the part of Lillie Langtry (as well as look good on camera). Linda also took the camera shots and sequence of each scene into account when the dress was designed as this controlled what the audience (viewer) would see. Finally, the set and lighting were given consideration as they played an integral part of the total screen image.

 

The choice of color, fabric and trimming were selected by Linda to best interpret her design. The undergarments for Francesca were constructed to create the shape and 'silhouette' required. Francesca was very slim, especially when corseted. The costume 'image' was designed to be feminine, and give a slightly 'vulnerable' yet alluring feel. The shape of the figure was designed to be clearly seen, but not provocative. Soft lace was added to frame the neck and face as well as at the wrists. The image is distinctly 'pretty' and 'appealing to the eye.

 

One problem was that Lillie Langtry was quite tall and statuesque (her stature well suited the shape and image of beauty of the time in which she was at her heyday). It was difficult to recreate this for Francesca Annis, who is far shorter in reality. Hence the cut, shape and proportion of the costume had to be designed to be balanced and the trimming done in such a way as to not  'everdecorate' or overdominate the whole image. This was very important “on” camera.”

 

As discussed earlier, the dress was designed so that the image is distinctly 'pretty' and 'appealing to the eye. Aside from the Langtry/Keppel/King Edward VII/Charles/Camilla association, this probably also greatly influenced Princess Diana in choosing this dress as the color (pink being one of Diana’s favorite colors) and silk fabric reflected well on her skin and enhanced her fair skin tone. It also lights well, which was probably important to Diana, who was always aware of the camera. When John Bright told Linda Mattock that he had fitted Princess Diana with this dress, Linda said that she “also agreed that the choice of color and fabric would look good on Diana as it is a very 'pretty' dress and would create a good image. It also photographs well and is very complimentary to most surroundings. I was of course delighted.”

 

One interesting point is that Princess Dianna chose not to wear the 'period' undergarments to recreate the shape and look as seen on Francesca. Also, John Bright had to lengthen the dress to accommodate the differential in height between the two women. Furthermore, the dress included a bustle, which is the only dress Diana wore that had one and which has drawn considerable interest [70].

 

As mentioned before, MediCinema, who made the ensemble available, is a London-based charitable organization that assists in the recovery of hospitalized patients by screening recently released films and movie classics.  Their on-site cinemas provide a source of therapy, stimulation and entertainment for patients unable to leave the hospital.  Among MediCinema's patrons are: John Bright, Joan Collins, Daniel Day-Lewis, John Hurt, Jeremy Irons, Ben Kingsley, Ewan McGregor, Liam Neeson, Vanessa Redgrave, Natasha Richardson, Diana Rigg, Kevin Spacey, Emma Thompson and Kate Winslet.

 

Finally, Diana’s Klondike ensemble has become a famous Canadian cultural icon due to the uniqueness of Diana’s ensemble and the history it represents, the historical importance of the royal visit [88], and the love affair that developed between Diana and the Canadian people. As Anne Lambert stated: “...the image moves people because it depicts Charles and Diana at a very happy period of their marriage, when they were the fairytale couple.” [89]. Hence, the 1983 Canadian Royal Tour itself, which was widely publicized in books, e.g., [1], [5], postcards, e.g. [45,48,49,50,90], magazines, e.g. [39,40,69], and other items such as coins, e.g. [91], pins [92], Klondike Dollars [93], is now often represented by pictures of Diana wearing her Klondike ensemble.

 

More specifically, the provenance of Princess Diana’s Klondike ensemble indicates the singular importance to Alberta where Diana first wore the dress and its royal connection to Canada was created (e.g., [71]).  The historical and cultural significance of Lillie Langtry’s visits to Edmonton intertwined with Diana’s later visit wearing a “Langtry” dress is of particular importance to not only Canada, but also to Edmonton. Also, for the people of Edmonton, the Klondike Days Festival has become an integral part of their community identity, and hence Princess Diana’s Klondike dress, and Lillie Langtry’s visits and theatrical performances in Edmonton during its early pioneer days, have become part of their cultural history and identity. In fact, the University of Alberta, which has an internationally acclaimed program in the field of historic costume (attracting students worldwide), has an ongoing research and collecting project involving the documentation of the phenomenon of Klondike period dressing in the community and the cultural significance of the early pioneer culture to the development of the Canadian West. Thus the cultural and academic value of Princess Diana’s artifacts is particularly high in this setting and will continue to be of particular import.

 

Other references, additional details, and descriptions on Camilla Parker-Bowles, Prince Charles and Princess Diana can be found in [94], [95], [96], and [97]. Information on Lillie Langtry, Alice Keppel, and Edward VII can be found in [98], [99], [100], [101], [], [], [102], [103], [104], [105], [106], [107], [108], [109], [110], [111], [112], [113], [114]. Additional information on Princess Diana, her fashions, etc. can be found in [115], [116], [117], [118], [119], [120], [121], [122], [123], [124], [125], [126], [127], [128], [129], [130], [131], [132], [133], [134], [135], [136], [137], [138], [139], [140], [141], [142], [143], [144], [145], [146], [147]. Some of these books were published before her visit to Canada and others are after. It is interesting to note that some of the later books only show mostly pictures of Diana and few, if any, of Charles and Diana together.

 

It should be noted that the author has only surveyed a small percentage of the publications and documentation on Princess Diana, thus there are likely to be many more examples then those cited above. The references given above are just to illustrate the popularity and wide spread interest in Princess Diana’s Klondike Dress and Hat. In fact, the author is always looking for more documentation, e.g., pictures, books, videos, personal information, history, etc. about the Princess Diana Klondike dress and hat. If you have any relevant documentation or questions, please contact the author at the email adress shown at top. This information is from the author’s web site, www.princessdiana.ca, and is updated whenever appropriate. It should also be noted that this web site gets 300,000 to 1 million hits a year and when the words “Princess Diana Dress” is typed in Google, it is ranked 11 out of 527,000 results[148]. Finally, the author would like to thank all the people who helped out with or provided information for the preparation of this article, e.g., Linda Bagley, John Bright, Christine Hill, Anne Lambert, Orville Magoon, Linda Mattock, Jan Glier Reeder, Fred Sroka, Ken Van Ochten, and others.

 

The pictures shown above are:

 

1. Charles and Diana in front of Fort Edmonton in full ensemble [64]. - IMAGE07

2. Close-up picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat [64]. - IMAGE020

3. Princess Diana’s Klondike dress and hat today. Courtesy of William Doyle Galleries. [66] - LADYDIAN.JPG.

4. Picture of Diana in full Klondike ensemble [64]. - IMAGE037

5. Claymates Doll wearing Klondike dress, hat, boots, purse, and gloves. Courtesy of Claymates. [72]

6. Picture of Original Design of Klondike Dress by Linda Mattock [78].

7. Picture of Diana in Full Klondike ensemble [65]

 

 

REFERENCES

[1] Charles and Diana Visit Canada, David Levenson & Trevor Hall, Collins Publishing, Don Mills, Ontario, 1983, 144 pages. Contains some of the best photos.

Cover of book: picture of Charles and Diana standing in front of log house, partial view of ensemble from waist up.

Pg 132 - full page picture of Diana’s face with hat.

Pg 133 - 6 pictures, Charles & Diana showing view of full dress and hat.

Pg 134 - 5 pictures of Charles & Diana, some with full dress and hat, some with partial views.

Pg 135 - full-page picture Charles & Diana partial view of dress and hat in front of log house.

Pg 136 - 5 pictures of Diana, some with full dress and hat, some with partial views.

Pg 137 - full page picture of Diana showing view of full dress and hat, getting out of wagon.

Pg 138 - 6 pictures of Charles, Diana eating, visiting in full and partial views of ensemble.

Pg 139 - 2 pictures of Charles, Diana with food with partial view of ensemble.

 

Pg 133 - “’Dress semi-formal, Klondike era,’ said the invitations for that evening’s event, and Prince Charles and his lady were game enough to comply. He turned up in frock coat and side-creased trousers, waistcoat and cravat, spats and a silver-topped cane; she wore a whaleboned silk and lace dress with bustle and train, and long lace-up boots. There was a Gold-Rush-style music-hall entertainment in which the royal ‘couple of limeys’ linked arms, sang and swayed to old-time numbers.”

 

Pg 134 - “The main event of the evening was a barbecue in a marque on the reconstructed site of Fort Edmonton. The Prince and Princess helped themselves to food, along with 850 guests.”

 

Pg 138 - “This original event was a definite winner. ‘It may not be in the best royal tradition,’ said one Canadian, ‘but it beats the hell out of tree planting!’”

 

[2] Diana, Princess of Wales: A Tribute, Tim Graham, Weidenfeld & Nicolson, The Orion Publishing Group, 1997, 96 pages

Pg 39 - 1/4 page Charles & Diana close-up partial dress & hat with plates of food.

 

[3] Diana, Princess of Fashion, Alison Janaway, Colour Library Book Ltd., 1984.

Pg 16 - 1/6 page picture of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg 32 - 1/6 page picture of Diana wearing ensemble from waist up.

Pg 39 - 1/6 page picture of Diana in full ensemble surrounded by barbeque guests.

Pg 16 - “Klondike style clothes were the order of the day when the Prince and Princess visited a reconstruction of a gold rush town in Canada. The cream bustle dress under which dainty kidskin lace-up boots peeped scored a hit with the barbeque hosts that night. So did Prince Charles outfit – a frock coat, cravat and wing collar.”

 

Pg 1 - “``Copy everything she wears,” said one, just after her tour of Canada. “She’s a walking style book.”

Pg 3 - “And on the same tour she was game enough to join in the fun at the Fort Edmonton Klondike-style entertainment, by turning up in high Victorian period costume, complete with bustle, lace bonnet, high boots and parasol. There was even whalebone ribbing in the bodice of the dress, and she freely admitted the following day that she was glad to be back in ordinary clothes again.”

 

[4] Diana, Her Life & Her Legacy, Anthony Holden, Random House, New York, 1997, 192 pages

Pg 53 - 1/4 page of Mounties with Charles & Diana, full view of dress & hat. “ Tour of Canada”

 

[5] The Canadian Royal Tour, Robert Jeffrey & Paul Russell, Methuen Publications, 1983, 32 pages,

Pg 30, 31 -  2 pictures, each approx. ½ page showing Charles and Diana with full view of dress & hat in a group of people.

“About seven that evening Charles and Diana were back on view, resplendent in period costume especially designed for the event in London. Charles was garbed in the late 19th-century formal wear that his Great Great Grandfather Edward VII might have worn. Diana took his arm in a cream lace floor-length day dress of the 1870s. They were off to a barbecue with a difference. TRH and 800 others, all dressed to recreate the halcyon days of the Klondike Gold Rush, would dine that evening on Alberta beef in the dramatic outdoor setting of the city’s recreated 19th century palisaded trading post, Fort Edmonton.”

 

[6] Princess Diana, Trevor Hall, Collins Publishers, Don Mills, Ontario, 1985, 408 pages.

Pg 31 - 5 pictures of Diana and Charles, and herself, wearing full ensemble.

Pg 32 - Full page picture of Diana in full ensemble being helped down from wagon.

Pg 129 - 1/6 page picture of Diana wearing dress and hat carrying a plate.

Pg 158 - ½ page pictures of Charles and Diana in full ensemble getting food.

Pg 164 - ½ page picture of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg 190 - Full page picture of Diana wearing dress with Charles.

Pg 215 - Full page picture of Diana’s face & hat.

Pg 216 - Partial dress & hat with 3 pictures of her and Charles and her alone.

Pg 323 - 1/6 page picture of Diana in full ensemble.

“And there was that superb Klondike-style entertainment at Fort Edmonton, in which Diana bowled over the invited guests in her high Victorian ensemble of peaches and cream satins and silks, high boots, bustled skirt, whaleboned bodice, parasol and a dainty flowered saucer hat to cover her rather twentieth-century hairstyle.”

Pg 401 - Attached Diana’s Fashion Diary: “June 29 Attended Fancy Dress barbecue at Fort Edmonton Park. ‘Mid-Victorian-style bustled dress in cream silk with faint pink trimmings and delicate lace collar, cravat and cuffs. The skirt generously gathered at the sides, the bodice close-fitting and buttoned down the centre. Small cream platter hat trimmed with silk bows, lace and small pink flowers. Cream boots.’”

 

[7] The Story of the Royal Family, David Levenson & Trevor Hall, Collins Royal, Canada, 1987,

Pg 269 - Full page picture of hat & dress with Diana getting out of wagon with Charles.

 Pg 268 - “Klondike fashions dominated a barbeque at Edmonton, and the Prince and Princess entered into the fun of the occasion.”

 

[8] A Princely Marriage, Anthony Holden, Bantam Press, London, 1991, 162 pages,

Pg 65 - 1/4 page Charles & Diana with full view of dress & hat.

“Picture caption ‘...and Canada loved her youthful joie-de-vivre’”

Pg 108 - “Diana’s status as the world’s number one cover-girl...”

 

[9] Royal Canada, Trevor Hall, B. Mitchell, England, 1989, 176 pages.

Pg 138 - 1/2 page of Charles & Diana with close-up view of partial dress & hat with plates of food.

Pg 138 - “Left: The Prince and Princess of Wales dressed for the part at the reconstructed site of Fort Edmonton, during the Klondike Days barbecue and musical entertainment that awaited them in Alberta. ‘It may not be in the best royal tradition,’ said one of the hosts, ‘but it beats the hell out of tree planting!’”

“... following the success of Princess Margaret’s involvement in the Edmonton proceedings three years earlier, a repeat of that superb Klondike-style entertainment at Fort Edmonton, in which Diana entranced the invited guests in her high-Victorian ensemble of peaches-and-cream satins and silks, high boots, bustled skirt, whaleboned bodice, parasol and a dainty flowered saucer hat to cover her rather twentieth-century hairstyle.”

Pg 140 - “The tour made 1983 a high point in the relationship between the crown and its Canadian subjects.”  “Di-mania became a household word.”

 

[10] Royalty in Vogue, Josephine Ross, Chatto & Windos Ltd., London, 1989, 208 pages

Pg 152 - 1/4 page Diana with full view of dress & hat.

Pg 152 - “The Princess of Wales in Gold Rush costume, in Canada 1983”. Compared with the Queen Mother dressed as a Spanish lady in 1923 and Lady Sarah Armstrong-Jones and Lady Helen Windsor dressed for a Raj party 1985.

“Royalty in Vogue is an album of stunning pictures chosen from eighty years of royal reporting, a unique and fascinating archive.” The book studies “the relationship between royalty and fashion.” And tries to answer “what is royal style?”

Pg 23 - “A British Princess had become a role-model for young women’s style”

Pg 25 - “...she was giving royal patronage to fashion as an art, as an industry, and as a pleasure”.

Pg 23 - “The camera has a unique capacity to conserve a moment in time” Vogue magazine

 

[11] In Person The Prince and Princess of Wales, Alastair Burnet, Doubleday Canada ltd., Toronto, Canada, 1985, 128 pages

Pg 76,77 - 1 picture-1 ½ pages Charles and Diana full view of dress and hat with Canadian Mountie in front of log cabin”)

“In June 1983 the Princess was to enchant the people of Canada too. She looked as beautiful as ever...in a day dress made up in the style of 1878 when she accompanied Prince Charles, dressed in a frock coat, on a visit to Fort Edmonton.”

Pg 78 - “...the royal visitors dressed up in frock coat and long gown as for Victorian Canada at a barbeque sing-song in Edmonton, Alberta, joining in the singing and foot-stamping.”

 

[12] On the Royal Road, a decade of photographing the Royal Family, Tim Graham, Methuen Publication, Agincourt, Ontario, 1984, 160 pages,

Pg 143- 1/6 page picture of hat

Pg 72,73 - 1 picture, 1 1/5 page size Mountie with Charles and Diana in front of log house with full view of dress & hat.

 

 

Pg 143 - “Some of the widely varied styles that have helped made Princess Diana a leader of fashion throughout the world...Her distinctive hats are a feature on many occasions...” (pg 143 shows Diana’s hat with a number of other hats she has worn.)

“The Prince and Princess of Wales in Canada, June 1983. The staccato whir of more than thirty Nikon motor-drives- fondly known as the Nikon choir – greeted the Prince and Princess of Wales as they arrived in period costume for a barbeque at historic Fort Edmonton. Prince Charles’s suit was a model of that worn by Edward VII when, as Prince of Wales, he had visited Canada, and Princess Diana’s pink and cream silk dress, with its lace undershirt, bustle and short train, was a recreation of an 1878 fashionable day dress.”

 

[13] The Story of the Royal Family in Celebration of the Queen’s 60th Birthday and the Royal Wedding, David Levenson & Trevor Hall, Colour Library Books, England, 1986.

Pg 269 -  Full page picture of hat & dress with Diana getting out of wagon with Charles.

Pg 268 - “Klondike fashions dominated a barbeque at Edmonton, and the Prince and Princess entered into the fun of the occasion.”

 

[14] Diana the Radiant Princess, Jane Owen, Royce Publications, England, 1983, 70 pages.

Pg 48 - full 1 page picture of Diana’s face and hat.

Pg 49 - 4 pictures of Charles & Diana in full and partial view of dress.

Pg 49 - “In bustle, bows, lace and frills, the Princess of Wales looked delightful – and her Klondike-style costume was set off by the prettiest pair of peach kid lace up boots ever seen in Edmonton, Canada. Later the Princess confessed her bodice was rather uncomfortable.”

 

[15] Diana The Fashion Princess, Davina Hammer and Tim Graham, b. Mitchell, Canada, 1984, 128 pages

Pg 90 - 1/2 page picture of Diana with a full view of dress.

 

Pg 90 - “The invitation for a barbeque at Fort Edmonton requested ‘Dress of the Klondike era’. The Princess of Wales borrowed a peach silk and cream dress from the BBC and looked magnificent. The small hat was adorned with ribbons, pink roses and pearls and long, lace-up boots added a final touch.”

 

Pg 86,89 - “The invitation for a barbecue at Fort Edmonton read ‘Dress semi-formal, Klondike era’ and the Prince and Princess of Wales rose to the occasion. Prince Charles wore a frock coat, striped gray trousers and spats similar to those worn by his great-great grandfather, Edward VII, when he, as Prince of Wales, had visited the same area in 1878. The style of the clothes worn then also suited the present Princess of Wales beautifully. For the occasion, she had borrowed a long peach silk and cream dress with a lace underskirt and bustle. Ribbons, pink roses and pearls adorned the small, lace-trimmed hat and long, lace-up boots completed the picture. It was a very pretty dress and the close-fitted bodice and bustle accentuated her small waist. It had been borrowed from the BBC where it had been worn by Francesca Annis in her role as Lillie Langtry.”

 

Pg 89,90 - “What then do we learn about the ‘fashion’ princess and what did she learn herself on her highly successful tours? ...She learned that ‘theatrical’ clothes work for her but that they have to be worn boldly. Edward VII would have admired her taste in clothes-strong and simple, even when she was not deliberately dressed like his favorite actress, Lillie Langtry.”

 

Pg 11 - “She is 5 feet 10 ¼ inches, with a near perfect figure and good bone structure.”

 

Pg 12 - “Today, the majority of the Princess of Wales clothes are more difficult to copy as her couturier-designed clothes rely more heavily on the quality of the material and the cut and are thus relatively uncommercial for the mass market. However, many of her clothes are still copied.”

 

[16] The Story of Prince Charles, Trevor Hall, Greenwich House, England, 1984, 74 pages,

Pg 65 - 1/6 page Charles & Diana with a full view of dress.

Pg 66 - “Two months later it was Charles who wore the fancy dress as he accompanied Diana to a Klondike-style entertainment at Fort Edmonton. The outfit was almost identical to the one worn by Edward VII during his North American visit in 1860.”

 

[17] The Royal Year, Tim Graham, Marks and Spencer, London, England, 1983.

Pg 120,121 -  A 1½ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble with Mountie in front of log house.

Pg 121 -  ¼ page picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat and ¼ page picture of Diana and Charles wearing full ensemble carrying plates of food at barbeque.

Pg 121 -  “Stepping back into the past, the Prince of Wales wore a suit modeled on one worn by his great-great-grandfather Edward VII, when as Prince of Wales he had visited the area. The Princess was dressed in a pink silk and cream day dress of the 1878 style complete with bustle, short train and lace underskirt for the visit and barbecue at Fort Edmonton, a historical monument."

 

[18] PRINCESS DIANA Pop-Up Book, Bounty/Hamlyn, 1984,

 “Here is a fascinating record of one of the most exciting periods in the lives of the Royal Family! Faithfully depicted in outstanding artwork are six scenes from the past few years to date showing the best-loved family in the land in a variety of settings, and moving! Surely never before has a family been so often photographed or painted, so seldom does one see a new image. These "pop-up" scenes supply several. Patrick Montague-Smith is well known as the author of several (British) books on the Royal Family, and was the former Editor of 'Debrett's Peerage'. Vic Duppa-Whyte is the World's Leading creative paper-engineer. Roger Payne has an international reputation as a realist artist, employing his talents with most of the leading paperback publishers in the Western World. He is renowned for his illustrations and character portrayals." What a lovely book! This is a 1984 "THE ROYAL FAMILY - POP-UP BOOK" Hardcover Historical Book. It is a rather large book with a glossy cover and measures 12 X 9 inches across the face. Was originally published by Dean International Publishing of London a division of Hamlyn Publishing Group. This edition was published by Bounty Books and printed in Columbia. There are 6 different 2-page Pop-up Scenes, ALL in full-colour with a number of different moving parts (really well done!). The scenes are: Barbeque at Balmoral, The Balcony at Buckingham Palace (Charles & Diana Royal Kiss), Ayers Rock (Charles & Diana on Safari in Australia), The Royal Crawlabout (first photos of Prince William with Charles & Diana), The Fort Edmonton Barbeque (Charles & Diana visit Canada), and finally, The State Opening of Parliament. ‘ (Comments by rare book dealer).

 

[19] The Royal Family Today, 1983.

Pg 92 - 1 full page picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat.

Pg 93 - 3 pictures of Diana in full ensemble and 1 partial picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble.

“In bustle, bows, lace and frills, the Princess of Wales looked delightful – and her Klondike-style costume was set off by the prettiest pair of peach kid lace up boots ever seen in Edmonton, Canada. Later the Princess confessed her boned bodice was rather uncomfortable.”

 

[20] Diana Princess of Wales, the Book of Fashion, Jane Owen, Collins, 1983.

The first picture in the book is a full-page picture showing Diana wearing the Klondike hat.

Pg 47 - 1/6 pages of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg 48 – Diana in front of log cabin. “Klondike style clothes were the order of the day when the Princess and the Prince visited a reconstruction of a gold rush town in Canada. The cream bustle dress under which dainty kidskin lace-up boots peeped scored a hit with the barbeque hosts that night. So did Prince Charles outfit – a frock coat, cravat and wing collar.”

Pg 52 - full-page picture of Diana wearing full ensemble getting out of a wagon.

Pg 92 – 1/6 page picture of Charles and Diana in their ensemble.

Pg 127 - full-page picture of Charles and Diana in front of log cabin.

Pg. 133 – 1/6 page Diana in front view.

Pg 148- 1/6 page of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg. 178 - In the section at the end of the book “Diana’s Fashion Diary” : “June 29 Attended Fancy Dress barbecue at Fort Edmonton Park. ‘Mid-Victorian-style bustled dress in cream silk with faint pink trimmings and delicate lace collar, cravat and cuffs. The skirt generously gathered at the sides, the bodice close-fitting and buttoned down the centre. Small cream platter hat trimmed with silk bows, lace and small pink flowers. Cream boots.’”

 

[21] Diana, A Tribute, Julia Delano, Ottenheimer Publishers, Inc., USA, 1997, 96 pages.

Pg 27 - ¼ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble. “The Prince and Princess of Wales in nineteenth-century dress during a visit to the Klondike in 1983.”

 

[22] Charles & Diana, A 10th Anniversary Celebration, Rachel Mark Clifford, W.H. Smith Ltd., Cambridge, England, 1991.

Pg 132 - Full page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble on steps of log house.

Pg 133 - “While in Canada in 1983, Charles and Diana dressed up in costumes of 1878 to visit Fort Edmonton. Here they are flanked by Mounties, after coming out of a typical wooden building of the old fort, Charles in frock coat and pin stripes, Diana in a long demure ruched gown and tip-tilted hat.”

 

[23] Princess Lady of Fashion, Jane Owen, Colour Library Books, Ltd., Surrey, England, 1983.

Pg 44 - full page picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat’

Pg 45 - ¼ page picture showing Charles and Diana wearing ensemble.

Pg 45 - 1/3 page pictures of Diana and Charles in full ensemble.

Pg 45 - 1/6 page picture of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg 45 – 1/3/ page picture of Diana being helped from wagon.

Pg 45 - “In bustle, bows, lace and frills the Princess of Wales looked delightful – and her Klondike-style costume was set off by the prettiest pair of peach kid lace up boots ever seen in Edmonton, Canada. Later the Princess confessed her boned bodice was rather uncomfortable.”

 

[24] Diana the Story So Far, Julia Delano, Bison Books Ltd., London, England, 1993.

Pg 27 - 1 picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble. “The Prince and Princess of Wales in nineteenth-century dress during a visit to the Klondike in 1983.”

 

[25] Diana, A Life and A Legacy. Anthony Holden, Random House, London, England, 1997.

Pg 53 - 1¼ page picture of Diana and Charles in full ensemble. “Tour of Canada”.

 

[26] Queen Elizabeth & Diana Princess of Wales, Brian Ralph Lewis, Purnell Publishers Ltd., Great Britian, 1983.

Pg 35,36 - 1¼ page picture Charles and Diana in full ensemble in front of log house.

Pg 35 -  ¼ page picture of Diana with unknown woman in wagon.

Pg 35 - ½ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble in middle of guests.

Pg 35 - “Back to the days of the old Canadian West with Prince Charles sporting the same sort of frock coat and suit as his great-great grandfather, King Edward VII, when he visited Canada as Prince of Wales in 1860. Diana, wearing Victorian bustle and tip-tilted bow-trimmed bonnet, was emulating Princess Margaret, who wore Klondike costume when she came to Canada in 1980. The turn-the-clock-back occasion was the Klondike Party held at Fort Edmonton, Alberta, where a barbeque was followed by renderings of music hall favorites, and the informal sing-song was marked by the royal pair linking arms with the other 850 guests. A ride on the open-top Victorian carriage (top left) was all part of the fun, and the wooden walkway on which the royal couple stand (right) was all part of the atmosphere.”

 

[27] Charles & Diana: A Family Album, Tim Graham, Michael O’Mara Books Ltd., London, England, 1991.

Pg 48 - 1/6 page picture of Diana and Charles in full ensemble carrying food. “Klondike fancy dress in Canada.”

 

[28] The 10th Anniversary Commemorative Edition Charles & Diana A Portrait of a Marriage, Brian Hoey, Colour Library Book, Surrey, England, 1991.

Pg 140 - ¼ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble talking with bagpipe player. “In Canada that same year, the Prince and Princess dressed up in Victorian costumes for a party and singsong at Edmonton celebrating the Gold Rush days.”

 

[29] The Story of Diana, David Levenson & Trevor Hall, Colour Library Books, Surrey, England, 1985.

Pg 28 – 5 pictures, ¼ page of Charles and Diana walking in full ensemble in front of log cabin. 2 1/6 page pictures of Diana in full ensemble. 2 1/6 page pictures of Charles and Diana.

Pg 126 – 1/6 page picture of Diana carrying plate.

Pg 153 – 1 ½ page pictures of Charles and Diana getting food at the BBQ.

Pg 158 – ½ page of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg 183 – Full page picture of Charles and Diana in front of log cabin.

Pg 210 - Full-page picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat.

Pg 211 -  ¼ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble. 2 ¼ page pictures of Diana in ensemble.

Pg 312: 1/6 page picture of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg – 276 - “And there was that superb Klondike-style entertainment at Fort Edmonton, in which Diana bowled over the invited guests in her high Victorian ensemble of peaches and cream satins and silks, high boots, bustled skirt, whaleboned bodice, parasol and a dainty flowered saucer hat to cover her rather twentieth-century hairstyle.”

Pg 401   In the section at the end of the book “Diana’s Fashion Diary”: “June 29 Attended Fancy Dress barbecue at Fort Edmonton Park. ‘Mid-Victorian-style bustled dress in cream silk with faint pink trimmings and delicate lace collar, cravat and cuffs. The skirt generously gathered at the sides, the bodice close-fitting and buttoned down the centre. Small cream platter hat trimmed with silk bows, lace and small pink flowers. Cream boots.’”

 

 

[30] Charles & Diana – The First Five Years, Ashley Walton & Jayne Fincher, Scott Publishing Company Ltd., London, England, 1986, 288 pages. Contains some of the best photos.

Back cover of book shows full page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble standing in front of log house.

Pg 178 - Full page picture of Diana in full ensemble getting out of carriage.

Pg 179 - One full-page picture of Diana standing in full ensemble.

Pg 180 – ½ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble walking with other guests, ¼ page picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat, ¼ page picture of Charles and Diana standing in full ensemble.

Pg 181 – Full page picture of Charles and Diana wearing full ensemble carrying food.

Pg 182-183 - 2 page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble in front of log cabin.

Pg  178 - “It was back to the Klondike style of 1896 when Prince Charles and Princess Diana visited the Edmonton Historical Monument, where they attended a barbeque. Princess Diana wore a pink silk and cream dress, while Prince Charles selected a suit modeled from one his Great-Great-Grandfather would have worn, and who, as Prince of Wales, visited the goldfields at the turn of the century.”

 

[31] Charles and Diana's Tour of North America, David Levenson & Trevor Hall, Greenwich House, New York, N.Y., 1983. 144 pages. Contains some of the best photos.

28 photos of Princess Diana wearing Klondike ensemble.

Cover of book: picture of Charles and Diana standing in front of log house, partial view of ensemble from waist up.

Pg 132 - full page picture of Diana’s face with hat.

Pg 133 - 6 pictures, Charles & Diana showing view of full dress and hat.

Pg 134 - 5 pictures of Charles & Diana, some with full dress and hat, some with partial views.

Pg 135 - full-page picture Charles & Diana partial view of dress and hat in front of log house.

Pg 136 - 5 pictures of Diana, some with full dress and hat, some with partial views.

Pg 137 - full page picture of Diana showing view of full dress and hat, getting out of wagon.

Pg 138 - 6 pictures of Charles, Diana eating, visiting in full and partial views of ensemble.

Pg 139 - 2 pictures of Charles, Diana with food with partial view of ensemble.

Pg 133 - “’Dress semi-formal, Klondike era,’ said the invitations for that evening’s event, and Prince Charles and his lady were game enough to comply. He turned up in frock coat and side-creased trousers, waistcoat and cravat, spats and a silver-topped cane; she wore a whaleboned silk and lace dress with bustle and train, and long lace-up boots. There was a Gold-Rush-style music-hall entertainment in which the royal ‘couple of limeys’ linked arms, sang and swayed to old-time numbers.”

Pg 134 - “The main event of the evening was a barbecue in a marque on the reconstructed site of Fort Edmonton. The Prince and Princess helped themselves to food, along with 850 guests.”

Pg 138 - “This original event was a definite winner. ‘It may not be in the best royal tradition,’ said one Canadian, ‘but it beats the hell out of tree planting!’”

 

[32] Princess Diana, A Year of Triumph, Astrian Marketing Services, Ltd., England, 1983.

Pg 41 - 2/3 page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble in front of log house.

Pg 41 - 1/8 page picture of Charles and Diana with Mounties on steps of log house.

Pg 41 - “Contrasting costumes … in the mood for the 1890’s.”

Pg 41 - “The Royal couple finished off their Canadian tour in high-style at Edmonton – once the gateway to the Klondyke of Gold Rush fame and now a bustling city enjoying a striking business boom. Edmonton has always been famous for its laid-back frontier style – and so it was very appropriate that the entertainment put on for Diana and Charles should be loud, lively and a little unbuttoned. The royal couple spent their last night in Canada at a costume barbeque attended by nearly a thousand guests in period costume. The Prince and Princess went along with the 1890’s flavor. Charles turned up in a natty morning suit, waistcoat, cravat, brandishing a silver-topped cane with true Edwardian panache. Diana looked enormously fetching in a dress of salmon-pink Thai silk with flounces of lace and ivory silk – an outfit originally worn by actress Francesca Annis when she played Lillie Langtry in a TV series. Guests with a taste for history enjoyed the joke – Lillie Langtry had been well known as the mistress of Edward VII, Prince Charles’ great-great-grandfather, when he was still Prince, of Wales and cutting a notorious swathe through the high society of the European capitals.

The couple arrived at the party in an open wagon drawn by six horses, ready for a highly informal meal of Chuckwagon steak and beans. The music-hall atmosphere in the vast marquee was led by British-born Gillian Campbell, billed as Klondyke Kate, who with a jazz band and a set of scantily clad girl dancers belted her way through an evening of traditional numbers worthy of  Marie Lloyd. Princess Diana joined in the singing enthusiastically – after all, it was her 22nd birthday the following day, and she was already in birthday mood – and seemed to take a special delight in the number ‘ a good man is hard to find’.”

 

[33] The Radiant Princess, Coombe Books, Spain. 64 pages, pg. 48-49.

Pg 16 - Full page picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat.

Pg 20- Full page picture of Diana and Charles waist up in full ensemble in front of log house.

Pg 21 - 6 pictures of Diana, two of Charles and Diana walking, one of Charles and Diana with musician, one of Diana and Charles standing, two of Diana in full ensemble.

Pg 21 - “’Dress semi-formal, Klondike Days,’ said the invitations for an evening’s entertainment in Edmonton, and Prince Charles and his lady were game enough to comply. He turned up in frock coat and side-creased trousers, waistcoat and cravat, spats and a silver-topped cane; she wore a whaleboned silk and lace dress with bustle and train, and long lace-up boots. There was a Gold-Rush-style music-hall show in which the Royal ‘couple of limeys’ linked arms, sang and swayed to old-time songs.”

Pg 45 - full page picture of Diana in full ensemble being helped off wagon.

Pg 44 - 5 pictures of Diana, two of Diana standing, 3 of Charles and Diana in wagon.

Pg 42 - “Klondike Days”

 

[34] Diana Unseen Archives, Alison Gauntlett, Parragon Publishing, England, 2003, 384 pages.

Pg 74 - Full page picture of Diana and Charles in full ensemble in front of log house.

Pg 74 - “The Prince and Princess of Wales in fancy dress at Fort Edmonton, Canada. They had attended a costume barbecue where guests dressed in styles from the Gold Rush age. Diana’s dress – earlier worn by actress Francesca Annis when she played Lillie Langtry in a TV drama series – was very heavily boned and apparently quite a relief to take off at the end of the evening.”

 

[35] Debrett’s Illustrated Fashion Guide, The Princess of Wales, Jayne and Terry Fincher, Webb &  Bower, London, 1989. 168 pages.

Pg 64 - of Diana and Charles in full ensemble with a group of people on a lawn.

Pg 64 - “Dressing up for fun at the traditional Edwardian barbeque held at Fort Edmonton in Canada in June 1983 for the Prince and Princess. The Princess is in a peach boned dress edged in lace and a small dainty hat. The clothes are reported to have been loaned from the BBC’s wardrobe department.”

 

[36] Royal Family Yearbook, Ted Smart & David Gibbon, Book Club Associates, London, 1983,

Pg 355 - Full page of Diana in full ensemble being helped from wagon.

Pg 354 - “Klondike fashions dominated a barbeque at Edmonton, and the Prince and Princess entered into the fun of the occasion.”

Pg 17 – “…both reveled in their Klondike-period costumes at a fancy dress entertainment at Edmonton towards the end of the tour.”

 

 

[37] Diana, Her Life and Legacy, Maclean’s, Maclean Hunter Publishing Ltd., Toronto, Ontario, 1997, 128 pages,

Pg 42 - 1/3 page with full view of dress & hat on Diana.

Pg 126 - “On their Canadian tour, Prince and Princess dressup in Klondike finery for a barbeque in Edmonton.”

 “The most powerful icon of fashion and style of her time” Giorgio Armani

 

[38] The First Ten Years Charles and Diana, Royalty Collectors Edition 4, Royalty, 1992, 98 pages

Pg 74 - 1/4 page picture of Charles & Diana in partial view of dress & hat

Pg 74 - “A Canadian visit involved Charles and Diana in an enjoyable spot of ‘Dressing up’ in period costume”

Pg 52 - “In preparation for any foreign tour her dressers, Evelyn Dagley and Fay Marshalsea, are crucial in helping to work out how many suitcases will be needed and when and where; how many changes are required during the day. Months before the Princess will have relied on the expertise of the growing band of British designers to create the necessary clothes for her. Sketches and fabric swatches will have been rushed to the Palace, the dress designers and milliners will have been in touch with each other and attended fittings (to get 15 minutes of Diana’s precious time is a real treat, as one of them pointed out), local customs have to be observed etc. Etc.”

 

[39] Royalty, Volume 3, Number 2, 1983. “Girl of the Golden West” cover

Picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat on magazine’s cover.

Pg 16,17 – 2 page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble with Mountie. (Center of magazine).

Pg 16 - “PRINCESS AT HOME ON THE RANGE - The big question all Canada waited to be answered was would Diana wear a period costume for the Klondike party and barbeque at Fort Edmonton. Well, she did, and Charles was game for it as well in an outfit which bought back memories of his great grandfather who also went along with the frontier spirit when he visited Alberta as Prince of Wales last century. There was also a precedent for Diana – when Princess Margaret visited Edmonton in 1980, a beautiful Klondike costume was designed for her and everyone agreed she looked fabulous in it.”

Pg 11,13 - “...Charles and Diana flew for 6 hours to Edmonton and undoubtedly the highlight of their 18-day tour.

This was their visit to a reconstructed settlement of the Klondike goldrush days when prospectors feverishly laid claim to land all over Alberta in Western Canada.

The Prince and Princess fully joined in the spirit of the barbeque evening by dressing in Klondike clothing. She wore a sensational full-length dress, complete with bustle. He wore an outfit almost identical to the sort of morning coat as worn by his great, great grandfather the then Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) on his visit to Canada in 1860.

After a delicious barbeque of steak, baked potatoes, baked beans and salads the Prince and Princess were entertained by Klondike Kate, British born Gillian Campbell. It was a riotous evening of naughty, slightly saucy music, dancing and joking.

Princess Diana joined in all the songs including ‘Daisy, Daisy,’ and ‘Its a Long Way to Tipperary’ and both she and Prince Charles were persuaded to link arms with the other 850 guests for a good old singsong. It was the sort of informality rarely displayed by members of the Royal Family in public and was an evening of light, friendly relief after two weeks of jolly hard work.”

 

[40] Majesty, Volume 4, Number 5, 1983. Picture of Charles and Diana on cover.

“Victorian Fashion Returns to Canada: The Wales Set the Style” (on cover).

Cover – Picture of Charles and Diana wearing full ensemble on magazine’s cover.

Pg 2,3 - A 1½ page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble in front of cabin.

Pg 2 -  “Tales from a Frontier Town – Victorian Elegance returned to the Province of Alberta when the Prince and Princess of Wales appeared in 1860’s costumes for a barbeque party at Fort Edmonton Park. Prince Charles wore a frock-coat similar to the one worn by his great-great grandfather (King Edward VII) when his visited Canada as Prince of Wales in 1860. The Princess admits to being uncomfortable in her dress of pink silk and creamlace, which was stiffened by whalebone.”

 

[41]Hello! (Canadian Edition), Rogers Publishing Company, Canada, Number 46, August 13, 2007.

Pg 70 - 1/2 page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble with Canadian Mountie in front of log cabin.

Pg 70 - “People thronged to see the royal beauty as she carried out a mix of official duties and gala receptions, including a Klondike-themed ball in Edmonton.”

“Charles and Diana pose in Klondike outfits during the princess’s inaugural visit to Canada in 1983.”

 

[42] TV Guide, “Diana 10th Anniversary Special Tribute”, Transcontinental Media, Toronto, Canada, 2007.

Pg 44 - 1/3 page picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble with Canadian Mountie in front of stairs of log cabin.

“An instant crowd-pleaser and always willing to chat with the public, Diana became a much sought-after presence during her first Canadian visit, with thongs of onlookers clamouring for a glimpse of the Princess at every tour stop. While in Edmonton, she and Charles donned historic costumes (above) to help celebrate the anniversary of the Klondike Gold Rush.”

“Undoubtedly, one of the highlights of that trip was attending a Klondike-period gala, where Diana was the guest of honour. The gala was held two days before her 22nd birthday.

The event was held in Edmonton on Wednesday June 29, and saw Diana and Charles stun onlookers at the evening barbecue with their meticulously crafted costumes. The dinner was held at the historic re-creation of Fort Edmonton; the invitations required guests to “Dress semi-formal, Klondike Era,” reflecting the annual celebration in Edmonton of the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush.

Pg 43,44 - Both Royals were game and dresses in the spirit of the evening. Charles donned late 19th century formal wear, similar to what his great, great grandfather Edward VII might have worn, and Diana looked beautiful in a form-fitting peach silk day dress and hat.”

 

[43] The Princess and The People, a BBC video narrated by Richard Whitmore. Extensive footage of Diana wearing her Klondike ensemble. “This video chronicles Diana's early travels in a year that saw her develop from a shy, reluctant tourist into a leading world figure. Following her overseas tours of Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and her visits within the U.K., this special profile shows how her unaffected charm captivated the hearts of millions and made her a superstar.” Color, 51 minutes. Over 3 minutes of footage of Charles and Diana wearing their Klondike ensemble.

 

[44] Charles and Diana: For Better or Worse, presented by Moira Stuart. Short footage. “ From their first meeting and the initial media onslaught during their courtship and engagement, to the Wedding and on through the past ten years, this stunning film follows the Prince and Princess of Wales establishing the foundation of their life together. It traces the glamorous and successful royal tours, the holidays, the births of their two children, and discusses the inevitable strains of royal life. And what emerges in these sixty minutes of fascinating film footage is a winning formula. A formula which has enabled Charles and Diana to maintain and strengthen one of the most publicized marriages of all time.”

 

[45] Diana, The Beautiful Princess. Duncan Raban/London Features, “The Beautiful Princess is a video montage set to music that captures the charisma of Diana. Her grace and splendor is caught forever in this collection of clips throughout her life...from the days before she was a princess, to her fairytale wedding, to motherhood and finally of her funeral. Watch and remember the Beautiful Princess as the world loved her”. Different footage than other sources, about 1 minute of her and Charles wearing full ensemble at the Edmonton barbeque.

 

[46] The Maple and the Crown ~ The Royal Family in Canada, CBC Enterprises, 1985, color, 85 mins. About 1 minute of her and Charles wearing full ensemble at the Edmonton barbeque.

 

[47 ] Unknown TV broadcast showing Charles and Diana wearing full ensemble walking down steps of cabin in Edmonton.

 

[48] 3-1/2"x5-1/2" postcard is No. 10 in a series of 15 postcards entitled "Charles & Diana In Canada". They are Sovereign Series No 3. 29 June 1983. The Royal Couple flew from Prince Edward Island to Edmonton Alberta where, in the evening, they were guest of honour at a barbecue party at Fort Edmonton Park. They arrive in an open wagon drawn by six Belgian cart-horses.

 

[49] 3-1/2"x5-1/2" postcard is No. 11 in a series of 15 postcards entitled "Charles & Diana In Canada". They are Sovereign Series No 3. Fort Edmonton Park. Invitations to the evening of red eye steaks, barbecue beans, and 1890's entertainment were worded: "Dress semi-formal, Klondike Era." The venue was a reconstruction of the original stockaded settlement at Fort Edmonton, gateway to the Klondike in the days of the Canadian Gold Rush.

 

[50] 3-1/2"x5-1/2" postcard is No. 12 in a series of 15 postcards entitled "Charles & Diana In Canada". They are Sovereign Series No 3. Barbecue at Fort Edmonton. The Prince dressed in the style of his great great grandfather who visited Canada in 1860. Diana chose a day dress of pink silk and cream lace with a draped over skirt, bustle and short train.

 

[51] Postcard of Diana showing the hat and collar of Klondike ensemble with the caption “H.R.H. The Princess of Wales”, E.T.W. Dennis & Sons Ltd., Scarborough, England. Same postcard also published by Pitkin Pictorials, LtD, 11 Wyfold Road, London, SW6 6SG.

 

[52] Postcard of Diana showing the hat and collar of Klondike ensemble with the caption “Her Royal Highness The Princess of Wales”,  “ The Princess of Wales, her hat at a jaunty angle, dressed in the style of 1878 for a visit to Fort Edmonton during her tour of Canada with The Prince of Wales in 1983.” Heritage Series, photograph by Tim Graham, Pitkin Pictorials, LtD, 11 Wyfold Road, London, SW6 6SG.

 

[53] Postcard of Diana wearing Klondike dress and hat among other guests at the Klondike Days barbeque.

 

[54 ] Postcard of Diana showing the hat and collar of Klondike ensemble with the caption “H.R.H. The Princess of Wales”,  Charles Skilton’s & Fry Ltd.

 

[55] Postcard of Diana and Charles standing in front of cabin in full ensemble. “The Prince and Princess of Wales in Canada, 1983”. Majesty Collectors’ Cards, Majesty Magazine, London.

 

[56] Large Digital Image Panels (approx. 2’ by 3’) made at the Clothing and Textiles Collection at the University of Alberta, April, 2000. Four panels made showing Diana in four different views of Klondike outfit.

 

[57] 7 pictures taken by Edmonton Mayor Cec Purves on June 29, 1983, during the Klondike period gala event. The pictures show Princess Diana and Prince Charles in full Klondike ensemble surrounded by Edmonton dignitaries. Mayor Purves has given Michael Smith permission to exhibit his photos.

 

[58] 29 newspaper and other articles (Just a sample of the many written). Many details and further information can be found in them:

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983 pg 1

Edmonton Journal 6/29/1983 pg 1

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983 pg A5

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983 pg A10

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983 pg A12

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983

Edmonton Journal 7/2/1983

Edmonton Journal 7/2/1983 pg B3

Edmonton Journal 7/2/1983

Edmonton Journal 7/6/1983

Calgary Herald 7/1/1983 pg A2

Globe & Mail 6/30/1983 pg 10

London Times 7/1/1983

London Times 7/1/1983

The Sun 6/30/1983 pg B5

Toronto Star 6/30/1983 pg A8

Montreal Gazette 7/3/1983 pg A8

Montreal Gazette 6/30/1983 pg B1

Calgary Herald 7/2/1983 pg A11

Globe & Mail 7/1/1983 pg 5

The Edmonton Sun 6/30/1983 pg 1

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983

Calgary Herald 6/30/1983

Calgary Herald 6/30/1983

Edmonton Journal 6/30/1983

Edmonton Journal 4/16/2000

The Calgary Sun 4/12/2000

Calgary Herald 3/18/2000

Alberta Report 7/11/1983

Sample:

Calgary Sun, April 12, 2000

Pg 8 - Diana’s Dress Makes Return”, ½ page story.

Calgary Herald, March 18, 2000, “Diana’s dress on display at auction”. Picture of Charles and Diana wearing full ensemble.

Edmonton Journal, Jan. 4, 2000, Edmonton to show off Di’s dress”, picture of Diana wearing Klondike dress.

Edmonton Sun, August 31, 1997: “Mayor Purves especially remembered the authentic 19th century dress Di wore for a Klondike-style barbeque at Fort Edmonton Park…”,

Edmonton Sun, June 30, 1983, “Royal Couple Enjoys City’s Party” with picture of Diana wearing Klondike dress and hat on front page,

Alberta Report, July 11, 1983, pictures of Diana wearing Klondike ensemble.

“…Charles and Diana emerged from the hotel transformed; he in a black morning coat with a white vest, grey pinstriped trousers, and a beige spats, she in a tightish, floor-length pink Klondike dress with ruffles and a high collar. About 45 minutes later they were seated in a horse-drawn carriage, riding down 1885 Street in Fort Edmonton Park, a re-creation of the city in frontier days. Their destination: an enormous $50,000 outdoors barbeque given by Mayor Purves and attended by some 900 invited guests. “It was,” observed Kenneth Lennoxm 39, photographer for the London Daily Star, ‘one of the best photo calls we’ve ever had.’

            Upon arrival, Diana drew a chorus of wolf-whistles as she stepped from the carriage, hitching up her dress to reveal a lacy slip and a slender ankle. A clowning Charles then descended off-balance, his cane waving in the air. Thus the mood was set for what one tour veteran described as, ‘the most informal and unusual entertainment I’ve ever seen.’

            With dinner in progress (and cameras now banned), local songstress Gillian Campbell, accompanied by can-can dancers in black, fishnet stockings, began entertaining the royal couple with her ribald, Gay 90’s saloon show. Surprisingly, the usually shy Diana clapped and sang along to such ditties as Those Were the Days, A Bicycle Built for Two, Pack Up Your Troubles In Your Old Kit Bag and Daisy. The prince and princess laughed and applauded during a six-man can-can revue featuring aldermen Ken Newman and Ed Ewasiuk with their pants rolled to their knees. Alderman Ron Hayter was then hauled to the stage for a bump-and-grind routine wit singer Campbell. When the group struck up In the Good Old Summertime, Charles and Diana rose, joined hands with those next to them, and swayed and sang along. ‘They’re fantastic easy-going people,’ enthused Mayor Purves after the barbeque. ‘They’re super, just super.’”

 

[59] An 11 inch China Caverswell Plate from the Peter Jones Collection for the Year 1983. Royal Events are listed around the rim. The center has a view of the State rooms in Buckingham Palace. Eight Royal Events are listed on the reverse, 5 are depicted with color photos including The Prince and Princess of Wales Visiting Australia and New Zealand, Prince and Princess of Wales to Canada, and Princess Anne to the African States. The picture of Charles and Diana in Canada is one where Diana is wearing the Klondike dress and hat in front of the log house and Charles is wearing a 19th century formal wear and cane. Next to this picture “Visit of Prince and Princess of Wales to Canada 14 June-1 July”.

[60] The Charles and Diana in Canada Calendar for 1984.

1 ½ page picture of Diana in full ensemble being helped down from her carriage.

1 ¼ page picture of Diana and Charles from the waist up.

1 ¼ page picture of Diana in full ensemble walking.

 

[61] 8 x 10 color photo of Princess Diana wearing the Klondike hat made by John Bright. 8x 10 Black and White photo of Diana and Charles in full ensemble on lawn among other guests (unique, not found in any books so far).

 

[62] The People’s Princess, BDG Publishing, 1997.

CD contains 4 pictures of Diana wearing the Klondike ensemble:

 

Picture of Charles and Diana waist up,

Picture of Charles and Diana in front of log house in full ensemble,

Picture of Diana in full dress in field with wagon in background,

Picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat,

 

In four formats:

 

            Screensaver,

            Wallpaper,

            Animated GIFS

            Biography

 

Also, this CD contains a biography of Diana with the following relevant quotes:

“On July 1, Diana celebrated her twenty-second birthday with 850 other guests at a Klondike Party at Fort Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. A barbeque and old-time singing were the attractions. To everyone’s enjoyment, Charles, dressed in an 1860’s – style frock coat and suit, and Diana in a Victorian bustle and bow-trimmed bonnet, linked arms with the other guests and sang music hall favorites…Canada had been a huge success.”

“Photographed and interviewed everywhere she goes, Diana has stirred up a new interest in the British Monarch.”

 

Finally, in the biography section titled “Difficult Times” about Charles and Diana’s divorce, the section starts with the quote “The fairy-tale ended almost immediately, although the public never knew…” opposite a full page picture of Diana and Charles wearing their fairy-tale-like Klondike outfits.

 

[63] Princess Diana & The Royal Family, BDG Publishing, 1997.  (Picture of dress on cover).

“as a tribute to Princess Diana, Princess of Wales and is a great collection of Royal Family images. This package contains Princess Diana Royal Family photos on CD and grouped into three different sets:

 

     - BMP format for use as wallpaper on your Windows desktop and other Windows applications.

     - High resolution set for the production of large posters or other high resolution

     - Ink Jet printable format for printing on an Ink Jet printer.

 

[64] Princess Diana Photo Gallery, BDG Publishing, 1997.

4 pictures in 3 different for

mats., e.g., in the directory HIGH_RES there are the following pictures in high resolution:

IMAGE007 picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble.

IMAGE020 close-up picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat.

IMAGE027 partial picture of Charles and Diana wearing ensemble.

IMAGE037 picture of Diana in full Klondike ensemble.

“Celebrate the life of Diana, Princess of Wales with these royalty free, high Quality images. This CD contains photos for Princess Diana & The Royal Family in 3 different formats.”

 

     - BMP format for use as wallpaper on your Windows desktop and other Windows applications.

     - High resolution set for the production of large posters or other high resolution

     - Ink Jet printable format for printing on an Ink Jet printer.

 

[65] Princess Diana 1983 Photos, Congressblvd5 Publishing, 2008.

Contains 4 pictures:

1 picture of Charles and Diana in Full ensemble walking carrying plates of food.

1 picture of Diana wearing Klondike hat made by John Bright

1 picture of Charles and Diana in full ensemble coming down steps of cabin

1 picture of Diana wearing full ensemble in front of guests

 

[66] William Doyle Galleries Auction Catalog: #198, New York, November 1999.

198 - Peach Silk Period Costume and Hat Worn By Diana, Princess of Wales, English, early 1980s, in the style of 1880. The form-fitting princess line gown of wild silk, with swagged overskirt ruched at sides and back to reveal silk lace flounced underskirt and back train, the lace repeated at collar, bodice jabot and cuffs, interior bodice boning. The hat of cream petal straw trimmed with period velours au sabre silk ribbon, silk flowers and pearl sprigs.  Each excellent condition, minor mark on back of dress. The dress was worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, in June, 1983, in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada at Klondyke Evening, an annual commemorative celebration re-enacting life at Fort Edmonton in 1885. The event coincided with the Prince and Princess's Canadian Royal visit of that year. In need of an appropriate period-inspired gown for the occasion, she chose this one from a selection of period costumes brought to her at Kensington Palace by noted costume designer John Bright, at whose studio, Cosprop, the dresses were designed. Mr. Bright personally fitted the dress on her. It was then altered to her measurements. Mr. Bright also designed the hat specifically for her to wear with the dress. Sold in Association with Bonham's of London for the benefit of MediCinema, a charitable organization that enhances the care of hospital patients by providing free film screenings to them and their families.

 

[67] Bud Haynes & Co. Auction Catalog, April 17-18, 2000. Two pictures of Diana wearing Klondike dress and hat along with a brief history of the dress. First time public viewing of dress and hat in Canada since 1983.

 

[68] Diana, Her Latest Fashions, Alison Janaway, Greenwich House, England, 1984.

Pg 3 - “And on the same tour she was game enough to join in the fun at the Fort Edmonton Klondike-style entertainment, by turning up in high Victorian period costume, complete with bustle, lace bonnet, high boots and parasol. There was even whalebone ribbing in the bodice of the dress, and she freely admitted the following day that she was glad to be back in ordinary clothes again.”

 

[69] Majesty: Volume 4, Number 4, 1983.

Pg 16 - “As a parting shot for critics who claimed her wardrobe was old fashioned, Diana left everyone speechless when she rolled up to dinner in a Victorian bustle. She was in good company of course. Her husband spotted a frock coat and suit modeled on an outfit the Prince of Wales had worn on a royal visit to Canada in 1860.”

 

[70] Newsletter of the Centerville Historical Museum, Centerville, MA, December 2006.

In the article “The Hustle - and Bustle - of the Season” which is about bustles:

“The undergarment still surfaces as a costume from time to time, perhaps most famously in 1983 when Princess Diana wore a Klondike ensemble during a royal tour of Canada with Prince Charles when both were guests at the historic recreation of Fort Edmonton and the invitation requested “Dress semi-formal, Klondike Era.” Diana mischievously selected a dress with some history behind it. It had been worn in “Lilly Langtry,” a BBC miniseries in 1978. Lilly Langtry, an actress and beauty who had also visited Edmonton, had been a mistress of the Prince of Wales (Edward VII), a story that was familiar to Diana, and at this time Diana was also aware of Camilla Parker- Bowles, Charles’s long-time mistress. Camilla’s great-grandmother, Alice Keppel, had also been a mistress of Edward VII, and Diana impishly said that she “would not tell the palace” about the history of the dress.”

 

[71] Original 14kt gold pendant issued April, 2000 in Red Deer, Alberta, to commemorate Klondike Ensemble’s first return to Canada since Diana’s visit in 1983, designed by Terence S. Balgobin, 2000.

 

[72] Original Claymates Porcelain Doll made by Carol Salmon, Ontario, Canada, 2002. Description provided by Claymates: “… a replica of a dress from the Canadian tour of 1983, this beautiful doll stands a full 32" tall, has poseable arms, and features molded high heel boots, just like the ones she actually wore that day. The original costume was borrowed from the BBC to attend a barbecue at Fort Edmonton, for which the invitations had encouraged "Klondike Attire". The dress is a very soft peach, with white lace trimmings, matching handbag and gloves. The hat is adorned with tiny peach and white flowers and ribbon. This replica dress is Claymates own design and will not be repeated! A tiny version of Diana's blue sapphire ring can be seen on her left hand. From an original sculpture by Donna RuBert, this interpretation of Diana is one of a kind. Price includes a picture of the real Princess wearing this dress.” “The dolls honoring Diana are each wearing an outfit carefully re-created from one of her original gowns and come with a photo showing the real Princess dressed in the same outfit. All dolls wear unique costumes created by Carol Salmon.”  It should be noted that Michael Smith, the owner of the Klondike dress and hat, also owes all design and reproduction rights to the Claymates doll’s replica Klondike dress and hat.

 

[73] Nesbit 1985 Nisbet Costume  HRH Princess Diana (Klondike) Hard Plastic, 8" Doll.

 

[74] A replica of Princess Diana wearing the Klondike Dress and Hat made by Alana Bennett. Alana is very well known in the Diana dress collector's world, having made many doll dresses replicating some of the Diana dresses sold at the Christie's auction.

From: Alana

To: 'Michael Smith'

Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2008 3:58 PM

Subject: RE: Princess Diana Klondike grown

 

Hi Mike

 I have made quite a few dresses that were on display in the museum in Ocala

FL and St Petersburg Fl last year …the ones I did were

Lot 11, 12, 16, 17, 22, 23, 24, 26, 28, 29, 40, 42, 46, 60, 65, 73 and lot

80 jacket - I believe that is all of mine that were in those displays and

they were displayed on dress mannequins not on the actual dolls since there

so many of them…

 

Alana

 

[75] www.thoneout.com, October 25, 2002.

Paul Burrell’s article on Price is Right:

“Welcome to Paul Burrell's Price is Right...the aim of the game is simple. All you have to do is look at our showcases and determine the amount of profit one would get for (hypothetically, naturally) liberating them from the residence of a dead ex-employer. First tonight we have the Klondike dress, worn by Princess Diana during a tour of Canada in 1997 and by me (allegedly, naturally) at various times in private afterwards.

 

It is made from finest silk collected and fashioned by child slaves in Burma. Without Diana's marvelous efforts against landmines, far fewer child slaves would have the amount of upper limbs required to produce such fine fabric. I have to say that it does rather pinch around the groin area although I suspect it was not designed for burly gentlemen with 15 years worth of private letters secreted down their boxers in order to remove them from the premises.”

 

[76] Lillie Langtry, Her Life in Words and Pictures, Jeremy Birkett and John Richardson, Blandford Press, Poole, England, 1979.

Pg 7 - “She had dewy violet eyes, a complexion like a peach. How can words convey the vitality, the glow, the amazing charm that made this fascinating woman the center of any group she entered.”

 

Pg 57 - “A creator and settor of fashions, in her attitudes to social conventions, clothes, sex, the paraphernalia of living, she was at least fifty years ahead of her times”

 

[77] Phone conversation the author had with Linda Mattock on November 2, 2001. She confirmed she was the original designer of the dress and it was designed to capture and exemplify the essence of Lillie Langtry’s style (after research involving thousands of documents and photos).

 

[78 ] Email message received from Linda Mattock, May 23, 2002:

“Why did I design it that way? The television series was complex and required many costumes per episode not only for principal artists but for all extra/crowd artists. I would take into account all the script requirements and action, the season, date, exact time of day, purpose, and situation that each costume would appear. The design would reflect this as well as fit within a historical context and be accurate to the period. The 'shape' or silhouette were designed to enhance the actress [Francesca Annis] and her interpretation of the part of Lillie Langtry as well as look good on camera. The camera shots and sequence of each scene are taken into account when designing as this controls what the audience [viewer] would see and the set and lighting given consideration as they play an integral part of the total on screen image.”

 

“The choice of colour, fabric and trimming were selected by me to best interpret my design. This would all be forwarded to John Bright at Cosprop, whose company were responsible for making the costume, of course in close collaboration with myself attending all fittings.”

 

“At the outset of the series, I undertook extensive research into the life, image and personality of Lillie Langtry and my designs were made to reflect and help develop the characterization of the part. There is limited [not extensive by modern standards] photographic evidence of Lillie Langtry, with some paintings. These were all collated and used in building up my image of her at different stages of her life.”

 

“Reference to the 'size' of the person in the sketch: In fact, we know that Lillie Langtry was quite tall and her stature well suited the shape and image of beauty of the time in which she was at her heyday. She was quite statuesque. I needed to recreate this as best I could for Francesca Annis who is far shorter in reality. The cut, shape and proportion of the costume needs to balance and the trimming not to 'everdecorate' or to overdominate the whole image. This is very important on camera.”

 

“The undergarments for Francesca were constructed to create the shape and 'silhouette' we required. Francesca was very slim, especially when corsetted. Princess Dianna chose not to wear the 'period' undergarments to recreate the shape as seen on Francesca and the garments had to be lengthened to accommodate the differential in height between the two women. John Bright would be more knowledgeable regarding this. The costume 'image' is feminine and gives a slightly 'vulnerable' yet alluring feel. The shape of the figure can clearly be seen but is not provocative. The soft lace frames the neck and face as well as at the wrists. The image is distinctly 'pretty' and 'appealing to the eye. I am sure this greatly influenced PD choice. The colour and silk fabric would reflect well on the skin and enhance both fair and dark skin tone. It lights well.”

 

“John did contact me to inform me that he had fitted Princess Diana with one of the dresses from the series. I also agreed that the choice of colour and fabric would look good on PD as it is a very 'pretty' dress and would create a good image. It also photographs well and is very complimentary to most surroundings. I was of course delighted.”

 

“I received a BAFTA nomination for Lillie. I have twice since been nominated for other productions and won ’BAFTA - Best Costume Design 1989 for a Television Series of Agatha Christie's 'POIROT. At the BAFTA Gala celebration of its 50th anniversary in the presence of Her Majesty the Queen and HRH Prince Philip I was asked to represented costume design for television [1 representative from TV; 2 representatives for costume design for Film] and was introduced to Her Majesty.”

 

“I studied fine art textiles [embroidery] at Manchester Art College and Postgraduate in Theatre Studies at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School. I started my career in theatre costume and joined the BBC costume design department in 1973. I moved to LWT in 1976 and designed many productions across the 13 years I was at the company, before leaving to undertake freelance work. In recent years I have rejoined the BBC to head a project to encourage and develop new young designers entering the broadcast and film industry.”

 

[79] Television thirteen-part mini-series about Lillie Langtry (played by Francesca Annis), 11 hours, drama, 1978. London Weekend Television. Directed by John Gorey. Played William LeBreton.  Footage of Lillie (Francesca Annis) wearing the dress while Prince Louis (Prince Charles great grandfather) first confesses his love for Lillie and Lillie later confesses her love for him and her desire to have an affair. Footage is in Volume 2, Episode 7: The Sailor Prince, starting at 24 minutes, 6 seconds.

 

[80] Letter from John Bright to Michael Smith dated April 12, 2000. Also personal conversation in September 2002 meeting with John Bright at Cosprop. Excerpt from letter:

“…We had taken 3 or 4 dresses for the Princess to make a choice. 2 of them were from the film Tess, the third from Lillie but at this time I can’t remember where the fourth one came from. When she asked what they had come from I told her, she seemed very amused but said that she wouldn’t mention it around the Palace…”

More detailed information was provided by John Bright during personal meeting with Michael Smith in September 2002.

 

[81] Condition/Treatment Report, Clothing and Textiles Collection, University of Alberta, April 14, 2000.

 

[82] Condition Report, Clothing and Textiles Collection, University of Alberta, November 26, 2008.

 

[83] A Ethafoam Body Mounted appropriate to the dimensions of the dress was constructed for Dr. Smith at the University of Alberta Clothing and Textiles Collection for the Klondike dress. See [81].

 

[84] Letter dated March 2, 2000 by Jan Glier Reeder, Couture and Textiles Department, William  Doyle Galleries, New York, New York:

 

March 20, 2000

(address of Mr. Smith)

Dear Mr.  Smith:

This is to confirm that on November 16, 1999, you purchased Lot 198 in our Couture and Textiles Auction. This was the peach silk Period Costume and Hat worn by Diana, Princess of Wales, at the Klondike celebration in Edmonton, Alberta, in June of 1983. The dress was made at Cosprop, costume workshops of John Bright, and there were no duplicates of this dress made, as is stated in the enclosed copy of the letter sent to Medicinema, the consignor, dated March 12, 1999 and signed by Mr. Bright.

Thank you for your patronage.

Sincerely yours,

Jan Glier Reeder

Couture and Textiles Department

 

[85] Letter dated March 12, 1999 by John Bright, founder and owner of Cosprop addressed to Medicinema:

 

03/12/99

Christine Hill

Medicinema

Conybeare House

Guy’s Hospital

London SE1 9RT

Dear Christine:

This is to confirm that both the dress and hat worn by Princess Diana for her visit to Canada are unique.  We did not make any copies.

Yours sincerely,

John Bright

 

[86] Original color design sketch of Princess Diana’s Klondike Dress by Linda Mattock. Approximately 28” x 20” framed. Purchased by Michael Smith, along with the design rights to the sketch and Klondike dress, from their designer, Linda Mattock, in 2002.

 

[87] http://www.bafta.org/awards/television/nominations/?year=1978.

 

British Academy of Film and Television Arts 1978

Nominations

Costume Design

LILLIE

* Francis Tempest

* Linda Mattock

 

[88] See Schedule of Canadian Royal Tour

 

[89] Edmonton Journal, Nov. 23, 1999.

 

[90] Set of 3-1/2"x5-1/2" postcard series of 15 postcards entitled "Charles & Diana In Canada". They are Sovereign Series No 3. 29 June 1983. Besides postcard # 10, 11 and 12 above [48], [49], [50], the other 12 postcards show Charles and Diana visiting Canada during their 1983 royal tour.

 

[91] Canada proof dollar 1983. The Prince and Princess of Wales proof dollar in original Royal Canadian Mint Case.

 

[92] “Welcome/Bienvenu Canada ‘83” pin showing Charles, Diana and baby William. 2” by 2 1/4”.

 

[93] Edmonton’s Klondike Dollar. Coin showing heads of Charles and Diana. “The Prince and Princess of Wales. Official Opening World University Games July 1st, 1983”

 

[94] Diana, the Untold Story, Richard Kay & Geoffrey Levy, Boxtree, Macmillian PUBLISHERS Ltd., London, 1998. 168 pages.

Pg 74, 75 - “…because when Diana had been pregnant (with William in 1982) and obsessively preoccupied with Camilla, she had made the first of several apparent suicide attempts by throwing herself down the stairs at Sandringham.” Pg. 58.

“…Three months after their wedding day in July, 1981, …Diana was upset and crying…The cause of the upset was, as ever, Camilla…”

Pg 76 - “Charles insisted then…that Camilla was out of his life from the moment of his wedding until 1986…But throughout these crucial early years, Diana could not bring herself to believe him.”

Pg 76 - “As Diana recalled: `I once heard him on the phone in his bath saying: `Whatevers happens, I will always love you.’”

Pg 76 - “…The Princess could hardly believe it when, in one furious argument, her husband tersely asked: “Do you seriously expect me to be the first Prince of Wales in history not to have a mistress?””

Pg 77 - “…Camilla…her husband’s long-time mistress…”

Pg 77 - “Camilla predated Diana in Charles life, of course, by almost a decade. The story of the former Camilla Shand’s first meeting with the Prince of Wales in 1972 is well-known. She introduced herself by telling him that her great-grandmother, Alice Keppel, had been the mistress of his great-great grandfather Edward VII and ended with “…so how about it, Sir?””

Pg 77 - Around 1978, “…Camilla resumed her affair with Prince Charles. Diana always believed that it was never interrupted again.”

 

[95] Camilla The Kings Mistress, A Love Story, Caroine Graham, 1992, 240 pages.

 

[96] Camilla, The King's Mistress, A Royal Scandal, Caroline Graham. 1994, 284 pages.

Interesting details, e.g., like the butler coming upon Camilla and Prince Charles one night in the bushes outside Highgrove while Princess Diana slept upstairs.

 

[97] Elle Magazine, 1999. Article on Camilla Parker Bowles with several photos, including an early one with Princess Diana.

 

[98] Majesty, Volume 8, No. 12, April 1988, pg 36-39, “A King in Love”, A good brief bio of Lillie Langtry, Countess of Warwick, and Alice Keppel, all mistresses of Edward VII.

 

[99] The Gilded Lily. The Life and Loves of the fabulous Lillie Langtry, Ernest Dudley, Odhams Press. London, 1958, First Edition.

Pg 14 - “Mrs. Langtry inspired new fashions; once, when she was hurrying off to lunch, and not liking any of her hats, she wound some black velvet round her head, held in place by a quill. Immediately, it was copied and the Langtry Toque appeared in every smart milliner’s window. Shoes were named after her, and parasols.”

 

Pg 54 - “Alexandra, Princess of Wales,…she had always gone out of her way to be pleasant to Lillie….during a dinner party…Lillie suddenly felt unwell. Princess Alexandra packed her off home to bed and half an hour later sent her own physician, Francis Laking, to see her. The following Afternoon she called herself to inquire after Lillie’s condition.”

 

Pg 200, 201 - On the death of Edward VII: “Lillie was at Regal Lodge on 7 may, when she received a summons to go to Buckingham Palace the next day. ..Queen Alexandra met her with a glass of brandy…Queen Alexandra gave Lillie some beautiful red roses, took her up to the death-chamber, where she placed them in King Edward’s arms. He was buried with them, or at least she forever liked to think so. Downstairs again, Queen Alexandra gave Lillie a signed photograph of herself and kissed her Adieu.”

 

Pg 206 - Queen Alexandra also gave Lillie Edward VII’s dog Caesar.

 

Pg 94 - “One evening in Toronto, …Gebhard came in the worst for drink, ‘I’m going upstairs to call on lovely Lil,’…”

 

Pg 95 - “She played…the Canadians Last West’s audiences of gold-miners and cow-pokes roared their approval of her;…”

 

Pg 32 - “In September, 1870, Lillie’s brother Trevor Alexander, who was a Royal Marine Light Infantry lieutenant, died at Toronto…”

 

Pg 32a - “(picture) Lillie as Cleopatra at the Princess’s Theatre during the November fogs of 1890, which helped to close the play. Shem is displaying all her jewellery which her publicity gave out was genuine, including the ‘quaint silver amulet containing a few drops of lion’s blood’”

 

[100] “Lillie Langtry in Canada and the U.S.A.., 1882-1917”, Robert Lawrence, Theatre Research in Canada, Vol. 10, No. 1 (spring 1989)

Pg. 30-42. “She made Canada, between Halifax and Edmonton, at least an incidental part of all her tours except that of 1886-87…”. Lillie Langtry's theatrical visits to North America in summary:

1)  6 Nov 1882 - 9 June 1883 (Canada 15-17 Mar, 6-7 Apr, 5-9 June 1883);

2)  27 Oct 1883 - 28 June 1884 (Canada 29 Oct - 24 Nov 1883);

3)  4 Oct 1886 - 18 July 1887 (she did not appear in Canada);

4)  19 Sept 1887 - 26 May 1888 (Canada 1-12 Nov 1887);

5)  15 Oct 1888 - 25 May 1889 (Canada 29 Nov - 3 Dec 1888);

6)  28 Nov 1894 - 20 Apr 1895 (Canada 9-11 Apr 1895);

7) 15 Jan - 22 May 1900 (Canada 5 Apr, 14-19 May 1900);

8) 29 Dec 1902 - 3 May 1903 (Canada 29-31 Jan 1903);

9) 7 Sept 1903 - 19 Mar 1904 (Canada 5-14 Oct 1903);

10) 1 Oct 1906 - 23 Feb 1907 (Canada 4-9 Feb 1907);

11) 30 Sept 1912 - c. 15 Feb 1913 (Canada 9-25 Dec 1912);

12) 1 Nov 1915 -29 Apr 1916 (Canada 3-15 Jan 1916);

13) 4 Sept 1916 - 10[?] Mar 1917 (Canada 20-25 Nov 1916)

 

[101] Newspaper article

 

[102] Newspaper article “Lily Langtry Coming”, Edmonton Journal, Dec. 7, 1912

Pg 22 - “As has been previously announced in The Journal, Lilly Langtry is scheduled to play in Edmonton on the Orpheum vaudeville time this winter, but until this week no definite date for the engagement was known. Word was received Wednesday that the “Jersey Lily” would play at the Empire theatre for the first half of the week of Dec. 23 in “The Test.” There is no more talked-about person on the stage today than Lillie Langtry, not necessarily because the late Edward VII took a great interest in her stage career, but the fact that she possesses such an interesting personality”

 

[103] The Jersey Lily: The Story of the Fabulous Mrs. Langtry, Pierre Sichel, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, Inc. 1958.

 

[104] Original engraving titled, English Beauties. Portraits of several women including the Princess of Wales in center surrounded by Mrs. Langtry at top, Mrs. Cornwallis West, Miss S. Graham and others. Published in 'Harper's Bazar" April 3, 1880. Dimensions of the engraved area in inches, minus margins, 13 x 9 ½. This original 120-year-old engraving is in excellent condition.

 

[105] The Days I Knew, Lillie Langtry, George H. Doran Company, New York, 1925.

 

[106] Because I Loved Him, The Life and Loves of Lillie Langtry, Noel B. Gerson, William Morrow and Company, New York, 1971.

Pg 84 - “Princess Alexandra led the large group that hurried to Lillie’s dressing room after the performance, and placed a rare, impulsive kiss on her cheek.”

Pg 215 - “The tour took Mrs. Deering’s Divorce to Canada, and in Toronto Lillie did a good deed that she refused to publicize…”

 

[107] An article circa 1903 featuring photos of Mrs. Langtry, and Sir Henry Irving, and others. Four loose pages in full. Nice condition.

 

[108] The Prince & the Lily, James Brough, New York Coward-McCann & Geoghegan, 1975.

 

[109] Edward VII and his Circle, Virginia Cowles, 1956.

Starts with Edward's childhood and marriage, his life first as the Prince of Wales and then as the King and goes on to describe his amazing circle of friends and acquaintances. Included are Lillie Langtry and Sarah Bernhardt, Mrs. Cornwallis-West, the Duchess of Manchester and Lady Randolph Churchill, the Countess of Warwick and Mrs. Keppel. Among the men were Lord Charles Beresford and the Rothschilds, the Marquis de Soveral, the Duke of Devonshire, Viscount Chaplin and Sir Ernest Cassel. Illustrated with many fantastic photographs, also Queen Victoria’s sketches of her children and caricatures by Max Beerbohm.

 

[110] The King in Love Edward VII's Mistresses: Lillie Langtry, Daisy Warwick, Alice Keppel and others,  Theo Aronson, Harper & Row, New York, N.Y., 1988.

Pg 50 - “How did the two people most closely associated with the lovers – Princess Alexandra and Edward Langtry-react to the affair?… Alexandra, very wisely, accepted it. With customary grace and dignity, she behaved as through nothing were wrong. The blind eye which she had always turned towards her husband’s casual affairs she now turned, with equal determination, towards this more serious relationship. Indeed the Princess not only tolerated Lillie but welcomed her to both Marlborough House and Sandringham, where she always showed her great kindness. On one occasion, for instance, when Lillie was a guest at a small dinner party at Marlborough House, she was suddenly taken ill.

(Lillie :) ‘The Princess, so considerate and compassionate always, immediately told me to hurry home to bed, which I thankfully did. Half an hour later the Household Physician, Frances Laking, was ushered into my room, having been sent by command of the Princess of Wales to see me and report to her on my condition. By the next afternoon I was feeling better, and was lying on the sofa in my little drawing room about tea-time when the butler suddenly announced Her Royal Highness…’

Pg 50 - ‘The honour of the unexpected visit brought me at once to my feet, ill through I felt, but the Princess insisted on m lying down again., while she made tea, chatting kindly and graciously. ..’

 

Pg 45 - “’I resent Mrs. Langtry,’ joked George Bernard Shaw some years later, ‘She has no right to be intelligent, daring and independent as well as lovely. It is a frightening combination of attributes.’ “

 

Pg 45 - “Everything Lillie wore set a fashion. When she twisted a length of black velvet into a toque, stuck a quill through it and wore it to a race meeting at Sandown Park, copies of the creation appeared in milliners’ windows throughout London, bearing the label ‘The Langtry Hat’. When she wore a pink dress to Ascot, that particular shade of pink became the rage.”

 

Pg 50b - “10. (picture) Prince Louis of Battenberg who fathered Lillie’s daughter and who became, in time, great grandfather to Charles, the present Prince of Wales”

 

Pg 195 - “And secondly, there were times when, far from approving of Mrs. Keppel, Alexandra revealed an active dislike of her.”

 

Pg 196 - ‘What a pity Mrs. G.K. is again to the fore!’ commented Princess May. ‘How annoyed Mama will be.’

 

Pg 210b - “28. (picture) The King’s Mistress: the astute and fascinating Mrs. Keppel, at the height of her fame.”

 

Pg 17 - “How much did Princess Alexandra know about her husband’s unfaithfulness?’I often think her is no easy one,’ wrote Queen Victoria as early as 1864, when the couple had been married for less than two years, ‘but she is very fond of Bertie, through not blind.’ The Princess would have noticed what others noticed: how her husband was paying too much attention to a certain ‘Madame von B’ at Sandringham, or how he was ‘spooning with Lady Filmer’…”

 

Pg 218 - “Alexandra…The general public knew very little about her failings; to them she was a decorative, socially accomplished Queen with a reputation for boundless sympathy for those in suffering. She was appreciated for being virtuous and vivacious, dignified and natural, caring and insouciant. They called her the Queen of Hearts.”

 

[111] The Last Edwardians, an Illustrated History of Violet Trefus & Alice Keppel, Mercantile Printing Co., Mass., USA, 1985.

 

[112] Mrs. Keppel and Her Daughter, Diana Souhami, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1996.

 

[113] The Naughty Nineties. Angus Wilson, Eyre Meuthen, London, 1976.

 

[114] Autograph of Lillie Langtry. Provenance: From the private collection of Orville Magoon, a noted Langtry collector.

 

[115] Dresses from the Collection of Diana, Princess of Wales, Christie’s Hardcover Auction Sale Catalogue, 1997. Limited Edition, very rare. Copies often sell for approximately $2500 Cdn on ebay.

 

[116] Dresses from the Collection of Diana, Princess of Wales, Christie’s softcover Auction Sale Catalogue, 1997.

 

[117] Diana Princess of Wales Paper Doll, The Charity Auction Dresses, Tom Tierney, General Publishing Company, Toronto, Canada, 1997.

 

[118] Princess Diana, A Queen of Fashion, SB Publishing & Promotions, Ltd., England, 1983, 48 pages.

Pg 1 - “...earning a name for herself as the Queen of Fashion”

Pg 8 - “There are other designers who will be specially commissioned to create something new and original, but Diana also likes to browse through their ready-made racks and often pounces on something she loves at first sight. Some Diana details might then be added to it.”

Pg 13 - “She has a superb peaches-and-cream complexion that needs no extra help.”

Pg 14 – “Pink is Diana’s favorable fashion color.”

Pg 34 - “size... a perfect 10...enviable 34-24-36 inch figure and her weight was 9 stone and 12 pounds. Now her slender frame is even neater, trimmer; dieting and dance exercise has reduced her weight and taken inches off her vital statistics.”  Height is 5’10”

Pg 27 - “She is the world’s number one cover girl...”

 

[119] Diana the Secrets of Her Style, Diane Clehane, GT Publishing, New York, 1998, 159 pages.

Pg 10 - “But her position as one of the most legendary figures of our time is assured partly because our favorite images of her are forever frozen in time.”

Pg 8 - Diana, Princess of Wales, was one of fashion’s brightest stars. ... her greatest contribution to fashion was her intuitive understanding of the power of style.”

Pg 28 - “Although Diana was under the tutelage of the editors of Vogue, she never relied exclusively on their guidance”

Pg 54 - “22” waist”

Pg 55 - English size 10, American size 8

Pg 54 - “Everything, said Starzewski, was always bought and paid for. ‘As British designers, we were not allowed to give her clothes because of the whole system of royal warrants. You actually had to bill Buckingham Palace and were paid by Prince Charles. Any gifts would have been perceived as bribery and influence’”

Pg 55 -  “Contrary to popular belief, the Princess did not have most of her clothes made especially for her.”

Pg 147 - “...the most enduring fashion icon of the modern age...”

 

[120] Diana Princess of Wales Special Collectors Edition An Interactive Biography, Simon & Schuster and

     Compuworks, this CD interactive biography features exclusive video, an informative text and rare photographs and illustrations including a one-hour exclusive video from Britain’s Station ITN.

 

     “Going from her childhood to her fairy tale marriage, role as loving mother and inspirational humanitarian and finally to her tragic death, you can use this first class software to learn about the life and times of Diana, her charity work and her role as model for women everywhere. Includes a detailed interactive family tree and a virtual gallery of her famous trend setting fashions. Trevor McDonald, OBE and main presenter of ITN guides you through Diana's life and introduces special sections on her charity work and her role as fashion leader.”

 

[121] The Diana Look, the Princess Diana Fashion Book, Sue James, Quill, New York, 1984.

Good book on Diana’s fashions and the thoughts behind them.

 

[122] Diana A Life in Fashion, Georgina Howell, Daily Mail, 1998.

A six part series on Diana’s fashions.

 

[123] Diana, A Tribute to the People’s Princess, Peter Donnelly, Whitecap Books. Canada, 1997.

 

[124] In Private-In Public The Prince and Princess of Wales, Alastair Burnet, Michael O’Mara Books Ltd., England, 1986.

A good book covering behind the scenes preparations for Diana’s royal tours.

 

[125] Princess, Robert Lacey, McClelland and Stewart, London, England, 1982.

An early book showing some of Diana’s early fashions before she visited Canada.

 

[126] Diana’s Diary, An Intimate Portrait of the Princess of Wales, Andrew Morton, Michael O’Mara Books Ltd., London, England, 1990.

A rare book discussing many details of Diana, including an estimate of the cost of various items in her wardrobe.

 

[127] Forever Diana, Maclean Hunter Publishing LTD, Toronto, Ontario, September 15, 1997.

 

[128] Diana Princess of Wales 1961-1997, Maclean’s, Maclean Hunter Publishing LTD, Toronto, Ontario, September 8, 1997.

 

[129] Diana, Princess of Wales, an Audio Tribute.

 

[130] The Decade of Diana, Royalty Monthly Collectors Editions No. 1, Royalty Monthly, London, England.

 

[131] Diana, Princess of Wales, A Tribute in Photographs, Michael O’Mara, Michael O’Mara Books, Ltd., London, 1997.

 

[132] Princess Leader of Fashion, Martina Shaw, Colour Library Books, England, 1983.

 

[133] Diana, To Mark the Anniversary of Her Tragic Death, OK! Magazine, London, 1998.

 

[134] Diana H.R.H. The Princess of Wales, Tim Graham, Michael O’Mara Books, Ltd., London, 1998.

 

[135] Diana, Her True Story, Andrew Morton, Simon & Schuster Inc., New York, N.Y., 1992

 

[136] Dressing Diana, Tim Graham & Tamsin Blanchard, Orion Publishing Group, London, 1998.

 

[137] Diana Princess of Wales, Nicholas Courtney, Park Lane Press, London, 1982.

 

[138] The Royal Nursery & Fashion Handbook, Sue James, Orbis Publishing, London, 1984.

 

[139] Travels With A Princess, Jayne Fincher, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, London, 1990.

 

[140] Diana, Her Life in Photographs, Michael O’Mara, Michael O’Mara Books Ltd., London, 1995.

 

[141] Diana, Portrait of a Princess, Jayne Fincher, Simon and Schuster, New York, N.Y., 1998.

 

[142] The Princess of Wales Fashion Handbook, Sue James, Orbis Publishing, London, 1984.

 

[143] Settling Down, James Whitaker, Quartet Books, Ltd., London, 1981.

 

[144] Diana A Celebration, George Perry, W.H. Smith and Sons, Ltd., 1982.

 

[145] Diana Princess of Wales, Scholastic Publications, Ltd., London, 1986.

 

[146] Diana Princess of Wales Mother-to-be, Sandra Barwick, Pitkin Pictorials, 1982.

 

[147] Diana, The’s People’s Princess, DVD, Blueprint Productions Ltd., USA.

“This sensitive and glowing portrait of Diana, Princess of Wales, shows the warm and human side of the world’s most famous woman…Lady Di had a unique ability to bring people together even in the worst of times and conditions. Her short presence here with us and her unparalleled achievements throughout the world will have an impact forever. Princess Diana will always remain the undisputed Queen of Hearts the world over.”

 

[148] Search results on Google on 12/21/2008:

“Results 1 - 20 of about 527,000 for princess diana dress.” Web site is listed as result number 11.

 

From Canadian Heritage:

 

 Royal visits from 1786 to 1951:

This is a list of visits to Canada by members of the Royal Family, along with the periods of residence of royal governors general.

1786-87 Prince William, the future King William IV, came to Canada as part of a naval contingent serving in North America and the West Indies. 

1791-98, 

1799-1800  Prince Edward, Duke of Kent (later father of Queen Victoria), fourth son of King George III, stayed in Canada on military duties and as Commander of British North American troops. 

1860 Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, undertook a two-month tour of Upper and Lower Canada. 

1861 Prince Alfred spent five weeks in the Maritime Provinces, Newfoundland and Lower Canada. 

1869-70 Prince Arthur, later Duke of Connaught, spent a year in Canada with the Rifle Brigade based at Montreal. 

1878-83 The Marquess of Lorne, accompanied by his wife, Princess Louise, resided in Canada as Governor General.  Many members of the Royal Family visited them during this time. 

1890 The Duke of Connaught toured Canada for several weeks. 

1900 Princess Marie-Louise cut short an intended holiday in Canada, at the insistence of her husband, Prince Aribert of Anhalt, and of Queen Victoria.

1901 The Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York (later King George V and Queen Mary), toured Canada coast-to-coast as part of an Empire-wide voyage. 

1906 Prince Arthur of Connaught spent several weeks touring Canada. 

1908 George, Prince of Wales (later King George V), visited Quebec for the city's tercentenary. 

1911-16 The Duke of Connaught, accompanied by the Duchess of Connaught and Princess Patricia, resided in Canada as Governor General. 

1913 Prince Albert, Duke of York (later King George VI), visited parts of Canada during his service with the Royal Navy, with his ship, HMS Cumberland. 

1919 Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII), undertook a two-month tour of Canada. 

1923 Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII), visited his ranch in Alberta, calling in at many major towns and cities over a seven-week period. 

1924 Edward, Prince of Wales (later King Edward VIII), paid another visit to his ranch, as part of an unofficial tour of Canada. 

1926 Prince George (later Duke of Kent) visited parts of Canada, including the West coast. 

1927 Edward, Prince of Wales, and Prince George visited Canada for the Diamond Jubilee of the Confederation. 

1928 Prince George paid a private visit to Canada. 

1929 Prince Henry (later Duke of Gloucester) spent a short time privately in Canada. 

1939 King George VI and Queen Elizabeth undertook a six-week coast-to-coast tour of Canada. 

1940-46 The Earl of Athlone, with his wife Princess Alice, resided in Canada as Governor General. 

1941 Prince George, Duke of Kent, visited air bases and training centres in Canada. 

1941 The Duke and Duchess of Windsor visited their ranch near Calgary

1945 Viscount Lascelles (later Earl of Harewood) joined the staff of Government House as A.D.C. to the Earl of Athlone. 

1945 The Duke and Duchess of Windsor spend a short holiday in New Brunswick. 

1951 Princess Elizabeth and The Duke of Edinburgh undertook a coast-to-coast tour of Canada. 

 

[Taken from «Royal Canada, Trevor Hall, 1989, Archive Publishing]:

 

1983 (Prince of Wales accompanied by The Princess Wales) 

June 14 (Arr. 12:30 p.m.) 

July 1 (Dep. 5:00 p.m.) 18 x     N.S.: Halifax, Shelbourne/N.B., Saint John, Dalhousie, St-Andrews-by-the Sea, Dartmouth/Ottawa/Nfld, 

St. John's, Carbonear, Harbour Grace. 

PEI: Charlottetown, Montague, Summerside. 

Alberta: Edmonton for Official opening of 1983 World Universities Games 

Nfld: to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Sir Humphrey Gilbert having taken possession of Newfoundland in the name of Queen Elizabeth I. 

N.B.: Saint John, Charlo, Dalhousie, St-Andrews-by-the-Sea, Darmouth 

N.S.: Halifax, Shelbourne, Lunenburg to celebrate in these two provinces the 200th Anniversary of the United Empire Loyalists 

 

 © Michael H. Smith, 2002, 2009

 

 

 

 

   
   
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